SDG&E PREPARES FOR HEAT WAVE

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Tips Available for Customers to Save Energy

Sept. 12, 2014 (San Diego)– As some of the hottest weather of the year approaches over the next several days, San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) is prepared to meet system demand with crews on standby if needed, and tips available for customers to save energy and avoid high bills caused by increased energy use.

SDG&E has adequate power supplies lined up to meet customer demands during the heat wave. Despite having adequate electric resources, conditions may change anytime due to unexpected situations. With expectations that demand on the electric system may near record-peak levels, the utility is preparing for any potential issues that could arise with increased levels of crews and personnel on standby to monitor the system and address any outages quickly and safely. Additionally, SDG&E is working closely with the California Independent System Operator Corporation in coordination on system status and needs.

“At SDG&E we are focused on providing safe and reliable energy for our customers,” said Caroline Winn, SDG&E’s vice president of customer services. “During this heat wave, we are prepared to keep our system running safely and smoothly under any circumstances that may arise.”

Air-conditioning use typically increases when temperatures go up, and coupled with the rising cost of energy, some customers may see an increase in their upcoming utility bills. SDG&E offers a variety of tips, resources and solutions to help customers find smart ways to reduce their energy use now to avoid being surprised by high bills.

Energy-saving tips for residential customers:

  • Close blinds and curtains during the warmest hours of the day.
  • Use fans. Use a ceiling or portable fan instead of air-conditioning (A/C).
  • Adjust your thermostat if possible. Set it to 78°F for summer A/C.
  • Power down equipment and use smart strips. Unplug items when not in use or use a smart power strip.
  • Switch off and replace. Turn lights off when you leave a room and replace regular bulbs with LEDs, which use 90 percent less energy than regular bulbs. 
  • Lower your water temperature or try a cold water wash with clothes, especially if you have an electric water heater.
  • Change out a single speed pool pump to a variable speed one. SDG&E offers a $200 rebate on select models.
  • Monitor your energy use. Go to My Account to check out the Energy Management Tool and sign up for energy alerts to receive email or text alerts when your energy use or spending goal reaches a certain limit.
  • Sign up for a no-cost programmable communicating thermostat (PCT). Using a PCT makes it easy to control your A/C through your smartphone. Sign up at sdge.com/thermostat.

It is possible that SDG&E may need to call on customers to help reduce demand through conservation. Customers are encouraged to sign up for Reduce Your Use Rewards alerts to receive a notification if the program is activated. By signing up for alerts, customers will have the opportunity to earn a bill credit for saving energy on a Reduce Your Use Rewards day. Visit sdge.com/reduceuse for information on how to sign up for alerts.

San Diego County residents can also find relief from the heat through Cool Zones, with more than 100 air-conditioned locations available to help residents cool off and reduce their energy bills by giving them a break from turning on home A/C units. SDG&E partners with the County of San Diego’s Aging and Independence Services to provide Cool Zones throughout San Diego, and a list of locations is available at SDG&E’s Cool Zones website which includes a map where residents can search for the nearest site.

Visit sdge.com/save-money for more information on ways to save money every day or call Energy Savings Center at 800-644-6133 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, to talk to an energy service specialist.

           

 

Comments

SDG&E

Yes, there are things one can do to reduce the cost of heating and cooling. But our electric rates are among the highest in the nation, and people suffer in the inland areas when daytime temps can be 100 degrees and there is little cooling at night. I use two window a/c's in my home. So Darn Greedy & Expensive. http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2013/apr/24/citylights1-electric-rates/#