EAST COUNTY ROUNDUP: LOCAL AND STATEWIDE NEWS

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June 14, 2017 (San Diego's East County) -- East County Roundup highlights top stories of interest to East County and San Diego’s inland regions, published in other media. This week’s top “Roundup” headlines include:

LOCAL

STATE

For excerpts and links to full stories, click “read more” and scroll down.

LOCAL

Judge Curiel gets another tough one (San Diego Reader)

Samir and Raidh Razooky, who run a Lakeside grocery store, among other things, charge that the Sacramental Healing group rented space at 13313 Highway 8 business route in El Cajon, and said they would not sell peyote or marijuana, their specialty. The suit charges that the defendants immediately began selling marijuana. So, the plaintiffs filed an unlawful detainer action .. the church says that "as a Native Indian Church of Sacramental Healing, [the church] is a sovereign nation and the litigation violates its civil rights.

Mayor uses veto power to restore special election funding (Times of San Diego)

Mayor Kevin Faulconer used his veto power Friday to restore $5 million in funding for November referendums on SoccerCity and expansion of the San Diego Convention Center.

Investigators looking into if El Cajon brush fire was intentional (KNSD)

A witness reported seeing a man leaving the area just before the fire sparked.

Immigration judge orders release of Mexican woman (KPBS)

A judge on Friday ordered the release of a Mexican woman while the government seeks to deport her …Claudia Rueda, 22, plans to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a program started in 2012 under President Barack Obama that shields immigrants who came to the U.S. as young children from being deported. Her case has drawn attention because she has no criminal record and is an immigration activist.

Judges say Edison failed to prove fraud, undermined its own case in San Onofre arbitration (San Diego Union-Tribune)

Southern California Edison undermined its claim to billions of dollars in damages from manufacturers of the replacement steam generators that caused the San Onofre nuclear plant failure by delaying proposed repairs and then deciding to close the facility, according to an arbitration ruling.

DA taking more cash, guns and other assets from suspected criminals (SD Union-Tribune)

Efforts by District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis to confiscate profits from illegal drug operations have ramped up lately, as the number of forfeiture cases has grown almost seven-fold, to 76 last year from 11 five years ago. The money she sought to keep climbed even more steeply, reaching nearly $2.7 million last year, compared to $13,387 in 2012 — a 200-fold increase.

Study: San Diego a Top 10 tech city (San Diego Union-Tribune)

San Diego is no Silicon Valley — but, when it comes to its technology prowess, the city outranks some surprising metros, including New York and Los Angeles, according to a new study conducted by real-estate outfit Cushman & Wakefield. / In fact, San Diego ranks No. 9 on the firm’s first top 25 list of tech cities in the U.S., which was published Thursday.

Re-Animated Records Comes to Life (NBC San Diego)

La Mesa finally gets a record shop of its own.

Developers of Little Flower apartments tussle with La Mesa neighbors (SD Reader)

Parking is the sticking point . The La Mesa Planning Commission on June 7 was scheduled to consider approving a special permit for Silvergate Development’s conversion of Little Flower Haven….  Instead, the City of La Mesa sent a June 1 mailing with the message “CANCELLED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE” in red letters on the public-hearing notice.

EU antitrust regulators to investigate $38 billion Qualcomm, NXP deal (Reuters)

EU antitrust authorities opened an investigation on Friday into Qualcomm's (QCOM.O) $38-billion bid for NXP Semiconductors (NXP.N), ratcheting up pressure on the U.S. smartphone chipmaker to offer concessions to address their concerns.

Topping off ceremony marking milestone in Viejas Casino & Resort expansion (San Diego Union-Tribune)

…the hotel tower will be all suites, there will be 3 new restaurants, an all-new Spa, Salon and Fitness Center, as well as a new pool.

Planning commission recommends approval of Christian tourism resort (KPBS)

The San Diego Planning Commission on Thursday voted unanimously to recommend approval of a new Christian-themed tourist resort and missionary training center in Mission Valley. San Diego-based preacher and televangelist Morris Cerullo has been seeking to redevelop the 18-acre property on Hotel Circle South for nearly a decade. It is currently home to the Mission Valley Resort Hotel and a liquor store.

STATE

Climate change could burn a hole in the Forest Service’s budget (Sacramento Bee)

Climate change appears to be fueling more wildfires as forest service officials are increasingly concerned they don’t have the funds to effectively handle another devastating season.

Signs of past California 'mega-quakes' show danger of the Big One on San Andreas fault (Los Angeles Times)

… California earthquake experts believe what happens at the San Gorgonio Pass during a major rupture of the San Andreas fault could have wide-ranging implications for the region and beyond. They worry a huge quake could sever lifelines at the pass for weeks or months, cutting Southern California off from major highway and rail routes as well as sources of power, oil and gas.

Can California really hit a 100% clean energy renewable target? (San Diego Union-Tribune)

California takes pride in its clean energy credentials, but the state may be poised to take an even more dramatic next step: deriving 100 percent of its electrical power from renewable energy sources by the end of 2045.

Legal marijuana could be a $5 billion boon to California’s economy (Los Angeles Times)

California is on the verge of creating a legal market for marijuana worth more than $5 billion that will help make the state a destination for pot-loving tourists, according to a new state-sponsored study…

California Is Now 13 Acres Bigger (Newser)

Thanks to a massive May 20 landslide in Big Sur.

University of California Announces Policy to give Illegal Immigrants Preference Over U.S. Students (2aNews)

18% limit on the number of U.S. citizens; No limits for illegal immigrant students. $40,000 tuition for U.S. citizens, $15,000 tuition for illegal immigrants.