Brown v. Board of Education

READER’S EDITORIAL: ON 63RD ANNIVERSARY OF BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION DECISION, A STATEMENT ON ELIMINATING EDUCATIONAL INJUSTICES

 

By Ryan J. Smith, Executive Director of the Education Trust-West

May 17, 2017 (Washington D.C.) -- Today we rightly celebrate the milestone Brown v. Board of Education Supreme Court decision issued on May 17th, 1954 striking down school segregation. Yet today also marks another anniversary – the annual issuing of statements reminding us that, decades later, we still have not closed the gaps in access and opportunity that segregate our students and limit their ability to learn.

When asked about William Faulkner’s essay urging the nation to “go slow” on integration, Brown v. Board attorney and future Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall pointed out “They don’t mean go slow. They mean don’t go.”

LA MESA-SPRING VALLEY SCHOOL DISTRICT TO DEBUT BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION DOCUMENTARY FILM SEPT. 29

 

 

District-Sponsored Student Speech Contest commemorating the 60th Anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision a huge success

September 26, 2014 (La Mesa)--Dr. Emma Turner, President of the La Mesa-Spring Valley School District Board of Education, and the District Governance Team, will host a screening on September 29 featuring the First Annual Student Speech Contest held earlier this year.  The topic of the speeches was “60 Years Later: What is the Legacy of Brown v. Board of Education?”

READER’S EDITORIAL: BROWN V. BOARD OF EDUCATION AT 60: NEED FOR RECOMMITMENT TO INTEGRATION & SUPPORT FOR STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT

 

By Assemblymember Shirley N. Weber

"We must dissent from the indifference. We must dissent from the apathy. We must dissent from the fear, the hatred and the mistrust.... We must dissent because America can do better, because America has no choice but to do better." -- Thurgood Marshall

June 7, 2014 (San Diego)--On May 17th 1954, the United States Supreme Court unanimously overturned the separate but equal doctrine of the 1896 Plessy v. Ferguson decision after arguments presented by Thurgood Marshall - then a lawyer for the NAACP Legal Defense Fund. The Court concluded that, in the field of public education, the doctrine of separate but equal has no place and that separate educational facilities are inherently unequal. The activism generated to enforce the Brown decision was a catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement and led to further state and federal anti-discrimination legislation.

My colleagues and I commemorated the 60th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education this week with a resolution as a reminder of the significance and the achievements of this Civil Rights milestone.  (View video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qq9YhN6qX70)  My hope is that we don’t let this anniversary deceive us into thinking we’ve fulfilled the hopes of Brown or that work of eliminating inequities in education is behind us.