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COLORADO RIVER FLOW CUT SHARPLY ACROSS SOUTHWEST DUE TO DROUGHT

 

By Miriam Raftery

January 25, 2014 (San Diego’s East County) – For the first time ever, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has ordered that supplies of water from the Colorado River and Glen Canyon Dam be slashed.

The Colorado River is the most important water source for the Southwest-- and it accounts for about 60 percent of San Diego County’s water supply.  It’s under increasing pressure from a growing population in southwestern cities  amid extended  dry conditions.

READER’S EDITORIAL: FLUORIDE LOWERS CHILDREN’S IQ

 

An open letter to Mayor Jerry Sanders opposing plan to fluoridate San Diego’s water

By Jeanie Ryan
 

January 1, 2010 (San Diego) --The problem with water fluoridation is that it negatively affects those we try to protect. The American Dental Association advises no fluoride for children under 6 months and then very little to one year of age-- less than that with is supplied in fluoridated water.
 

We know that fluoride crosses the blood brain barrier and that one in six children have a learning disability. Studies have shown that children in high fluoride areas have lower intelligence. (See a Chinese study linking mental retardation and low IQs to fluoride in water.) 

READER’S EDITORIAL: CITY SHOULD FLUSH ITS PLAN TO ADD TOXIC FLUORIDE TO SAN DIEGO’S WATER SUPPLY

“…The form of fluoride (silicofluorides) they plan to put in our water is classified as a toxic waste. As a toxic waste, it is costly to dispose. But as a sellable product, that expense is eliminated.” – Jim Bell

 

A commentary by Jim Bell

 

December 26, 2010 (San Diego)--I’m 100 percent against the City of San Diego’s plan to fluoridate our common water supply.

 

SILVER LINING: STORM EASES DROUGHT’S IMPACT

 

 

December 23, 2010 (San Diego’s East County) – One bright spot resulting from the recent storm is the refilling of local reservoirs and aquifers.

 

“By the end of this current storm, we expect about 1600 acre feet of net local water for this water year,” said Helix Water General Manager Mark Weston. “We budgeted 2200 acre feet from the local watershed, so with this series of storms, we ahe accumulated a great start on the water year.”

VIEJAS GRANTED RESTRAINING ORDER TO PROTECT SACRED BURIAL GROUND

 

Recent discovery at proposed reservoir site “unparalleled” in San Diego County

 

“This site is sacred to our people, and it is culturally and historically significant for all residents of San Diego County and southern California.” – Viejas tribal chairman Bobby Barrett

“Every resident in Blossom Valley, Crest, Harbison Valley and Alpine is a stakeholder for fire safety and economic growth in their communities.” = Mike Uhrhammer, communications, director, Padre Dam

By Miriam Raftery
 

June 8, 2010 (San Diego’s East County) – The Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians has been granted a restraining order in the Superior Court of California-San Diego County to halt the Padre Dam Municipal Water District from "further desecrating a recently-unearthed Kumeyaay burial and ceremonial ground," a statement issued by Viejas announced. Padre Dam Municipal Water District is constructing a new reservoir and pumping station at the site, which is on approximately two acres south of I-8 near Lake Jennings Park Road and Old Highway 80.

THE ENERGY THAT SAN DIEGO DRINKS

 

March 16 program to explore link between water use and demand

 

By Anne Tolch

 

March 9, 2010 (San Diego) -- When we turn on our faucets we use not only water, but all the electricity and natural gas needed to transport, heat, and treat both water and the wastewater. With local supplies insufficient to meet demand, most of this water and energy comes from outside our region. During a normal year, as much as 90% of San Diego’s water is imported from the Colorado River and northern California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

 

That’s right: that water coming out of your faucet travels up to 1,000 miles before it reaches you.

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