BIRD TALK: THE WESTERN BLUEBIRD

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By Greg Dunne

June 22, 2013 (Alpine)--“I'm a bluebird, I'm a bluebird I'm a bluebird, yeah, yeah, yeah,” to quote Paul McCartney. Just last week our “children” left the nest here in Alpine, our Western Bluebird children, that is. We enjoyed their company for about three weeks.

We have a birdhouse sitting on the railing going down steps leading to the front door of our house. It was put there some time ago just for yard décor; we thought it was too close to everyday foot traffic to be a choice place to set up raising baby birds.

We have many other birdhouses around the yard in very quiet places that would seem more appropriate then along the walkway to the deck and house. Nevertheless, this came to be the spot for the Bluebird family and I must say what a great job they did!

These photos were taken just days before the chicks left the nest. Mother and Father Bluebird pitch in to care for the chicks. Very busy they both were feeding the chicks – especially the last days leading up to the chicks leaving.

The Western Bluebird is a year-round resident of San Diego County, California. Between late March and August, they will nest and rear their young. The Western Bluebird is a secondary cavity nester, traditionally using holes in trees, usually excavated by woodpeckers. However, they will readily use a nestbox designed for bluebirds.

Western Bluebirds are native to North America. They are attractive colorful members of the thrush family. They can be found breeding from the Rocky Mountains to the West Coast. Their range extends from southern British Columbia to central Mexico. They are most abundant along the California coast and in the southwestern states.

The first few months of a bluebird's life are the hardest and most dangerous, because they have little experience finding food and avoiding dangers. It is estimated that about 50 percent of fledglings do not make it

 

through this stage. Those that do, live an average of 3 to 4 years, although lucky ones may live as long as 8 years.  

I cannot help but think of this tune by Paul McCartney when watching our family of Bluebirds this early summer:

 

 

Late at night when the wind is still I'll come flying through your door, And you'll know what love is for. 

I'm a bluebird, I'm a bluebird, I'm a bluebird, I’m a bluebird - Yeah, yeah, yeah.

I'm a bluebird, I'm a bluebird, I’m a bluebird - Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Touch your lips with a magic kiss and you'll be a bluebird too, and you'll know what love can do.

I'm a bluebird, I'm a bluebird I’m a bluebird, l'm a bluebird - Yeah, yeah, yeah

I'm a bluebird, I'm a bluebird, I'm a bluebird, I’m a bluebird - Yeah, yeah, yeah.

I'm a bluebird, I'm a bluebird, I’m a bluebird - Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Bluebird Ah ha, Bluebird Ah ha, Bluebird.

Fly away through the midnight air as we head across the sea, and at last we will be free.

You're a bluebird, you're a bluebird, you’re a bluebird, you're a bluebird - Yeah, yeah, yeah.

You're a bluebird, you're a bluebird, you're a bluebird - Yeah, yeah, yeah.

Bluebird Ah ha, Bluebird Ah ha, Bluebird.

All alone on a desert island we’re living in the trees, and we're flying in the breeze.

We're the bluebirds, we're the bluebirds, we’re the bluebirds, we're the bluebirds - Yeah, yeah, yeah.

We're the bluebirds, we're the bluebirds, we’re the bluebirds - yeah, yeah, yeah

Bluebird Ah ha, Bluebird Ah ha, Bluebird.



 

      

 


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