FROM THE CHIEF'S CORNER: BE A SPORT - PRACTICE SWIMMING POOL SAFETY

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By Fire Chief Sam DiGiovanna

It’s safe to say Summer is here! Memorial Day is behind us, schools getting out for summer break and Hot Weather is ahead. Many of us will certainly be headed for the pools!  Before you take the plunge, read this says Fire Chief Sam DiGiovanna.

 

 

  • Never leave a child unsupervised near a pool.
  • Instruct babysitters about potential hazards to young children in and around swimming pools and the need for constant supervision.
  • Completely fence the pool. Install self-closing and self-latching gates. Position latches out of reach of young children. Keep all doors and windows leading to the pool area secure to prevent small children from getting to the pool. Effective barriers and locks are necessary preventive measures, but there is no substitute for supervision.
  • Do not consider young children "drown proof" because they have had swimming lessons; young children should always be watched carefully while swimming.
  • Do not use flotation devices as a substitute for supervision.
  • Never use a pool with its pool cover partially in place, since children may become entrapped under it. Remove the cover completely.
  • Place tables and chairs well away from the pool fence to prevent children from climbing into the pool area.
  • Keep toys away from the pool area because a young child playing with the toys could accidentally fall in the water.
  • Remove steps to above ground pools when not in use.
  • Have a telephone at poolside to avoid having to leave children unattended in or near the pool to answer a telephone elsewhere. Keep emergency numbers at the poolside telephone.
  • Learn CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation).
  • Keep rescue equipment by the pool.

Diving injuries can result in quadriplegia, paralysis below the neck, to divers who hit the bottom or side of a swimming pool. Divers should observe the following precautions:

  • Never dive into above-ground pools. They are too shallow.
  • Don't dive from the side of an in-ground pool. Enter the water feet first.
  • Dive only from the end of the diving board and not from the sides.
  • Dive with your hands in front of you and always steer up immediately upon entering the water to avoid hitting the bottom or sides of the pool.
  • Don't dive/swim if you have been using alcohol or drugs because your reaction time may be too slow. Improper use of pool slides presents the same danger as improper diving techniques.

Contact your local fire department for additional swimming pool safety tips!

Fire Chief Sam DiGiovanna

*Note: The information in this article was compiled from various sources. These suggestions are not a complete list of every preventative or loss control measure. The information is not intended to replace additional safety manuals or the advice of another qualified professional(s). We make no guarantee of results from use of this information. We assume no liability in connection with the information nor the suggestions made.