GROSSMONT HEALTHCARE DISTRICT PUTS BOW ON $260M HOSPITAL OVERHAUL

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Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee declares 12-year effort a major success

Source:  PRWeb

October 17, 2019 (La Mesa) - The Grossmont Healthcare District successfully wrapped up 12 years of Proposition G construction improvements at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, financed by over $260 million in funds approved by voters in 2006, according to the Proposition G Independent Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee.

The Grossmont Healthcare District, which serves as landlord to Sharp Grossmont Hospital, focused on state-of-the-art hospital upgrades to meet increasing patient capacity and new codes and standards, while also building a facility for the healthcare needs of tomorrow.

Made up of volunteer citizens with expertise in finance, construction and project management, the Independent Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee (ICBOC) monitored the healthcare district in carrying out the commitments promised to taxpayers in Proposition G.

“From our first financial review to our last, the Grossmont Healthcare District has used the proceeds of the bonds not only as authorized, but also efficiently and creatively,” said Jeff Olson, ICBOC chair. “They’ve stretched every dollar and partnered with Sharp Grossmont Hospital for additional fundraising to give East County the hospital it so very much needs for years to come.”

Major construction objectives included: Completion of the Emergency and Critical Care Center; expansion of advanced rapid-response cardiac medical care; earthquake safety upgrades and improved disaster response; and, implementation of state-of-the-art medical technologies.

One stand-out project included the new $46 million Central Energy Plant, a San Diego County Taxpayers Association Golden Watchdog Awards finalist in the public-private partnership category. Opened in 2016, the natural-gas operated plant was designed to meet future capacity needs of the hospital. The facility systems also allows the hospital to continue operating even in the event of an emergency, such as a wildfire.

“The hospital is now no longer solely reliant on the SDG&E power grid, generating nearly 100 percent of its electricity on site,” said Barry Jantz, CEO of GHD. “Even in the event of an outage or other emergency, the hospital will continue to operate as needed.”

The crown jewel of Proposition G – the Heart and Vascular Center – was completed and opened for use in 2018, becoming the only dedicated cardiovascular center in the East Region. Located on the east side of the hospital campus, the $96 million, 71,000-square-foot Heart & Vascular Center adjoins the existing hospital with new operating rooms and cardiac catheterization labs.

“This particular facility was completed with the help of many hospital supporters,” Jantz said. “Since Prop. G bond dollars could only be spent on construction, the nonprofit Grossmont Hospital Foundation raised money separately for medical technology and equipment for the facility.”

At a ribbon cutting in July 2018, the facility was named the Burr Heart & Vascular Center in honor of La Mesa residents Ed and Sandy Burr, who donated $5 million dollars to the facility – the largest gift ever made to the hospital.

Proposition G passed by more than 77 percent in 2006, well above the two-thirds vote requirement. The bond-financed construction began in 2007 and was recently completed.

The final Proposition G Independent Citizens’ Bond Oversight Committee report will be presented to the public at the Grossmont Healthcare District monthly board meeting at 7:30 a.m. on Oct. 18, 2019. Read the full report and watch a summary video at http://www.grossmonthealthcare.org.

About Grossmont Healthcare District

The Grossmont Healthcare District is a public agency that supports health-related community programs and services in East County. The District formed in 1952 to build and operate Grossmont Hospital. It serves as landlord of Sharp Grossmont Hospital and owns the property and buildings on behalf of East County taxpayers. The district is governed by a five-member board of directors who represent more than 500,000 people residing within 750 square miles.