HEALTH AND SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS

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March 13, 2019 (San Diego's East County) -- Our Health and Science Highlights provide cutting edge news that could impact your health and our future.

 

HEALTH

SCIENCE/TECH

For excerpts and links to full stories, click “read more” and scroll down.

HEALTH

Biggest Vaping Study Ever Links E-Cigs With Heart Attacks and Depression (Fortune)

Fortune - Tobacco smoking adults that use electronic cigarettes have a significantly higher chance of myocardial infarction (a heart attack), as well as coronary heart disease and depression, according to the largest-ever study conducted on the public health effects of what many people refer to as vaping.

Boy never vaccinated racked up $800G in medical bills after tetanus required 57-day hospital stay: CDC (Fox News)

 A 6-year-old boy from Oregon, who never received any vaccines, spent nearly two months in a hospital, racking up more than $800,000 in medical bills after contracting tetanus from a cut on his forehead. 

A Gulp of Genetically Modified Bacteria Might Someday Treat a Range of Illnesses (NPR)

 Researchers think genetically engineered versions of microbes that can live in humans could help treat some rare genetic disorders and perhaps help with Type 1 diabetes, cirrhosis and cancer. 

SCIENCE/TECH

Facebook’s data deals are under criminal investigation (New York Times)

A federal grand jury is looking at partnerships that gave major tech companies broad access to Faceobok users’ information.

ICE is tapping into a huge license-plate database, ACLU says, raising new privacy concerns about surveillance (Washington Post)

Federal immigration agents have relied on a nationwide license-plate database to help find and investigate immigrants, according to new documents released by the ACLU.

Comments

Vaping

And no amount of data will convince many of these vaping addicts that this is unhealthy, particularly the young ones. Similar kind of battle with tobacco smokers. Many just don't believe it's unhealthy, and they have a right to do it - even if it affects those around them. Once addicted, it's usually very difficult to quit - permanently.