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HUMAN WEST NILE VIRUS CASES REACH FIVE TOTAL

SAN DIEGO August 18, 2008 -- Another
confirmed locally-acquired human case of West Nile virus (WNV) brings the year-to-date
total to five—including one patient in East County, according to the
County Health & Human Services Agency (HHSA).

 

FDA DECISION ON BPA OUTRAGES HEALTH ADVOCATES

FALLS CHURCH, Va., Aug 20, 2008 /PRNewswire-USNewswire via COMTEX/ ----Scientists,
physicians, and children's health advocates expressed outrage with the Food
and Drug Administration's (FDA)
announcement that bisphenol A - the hormone disrupting chemical found in
numerous consumer products including can linings and baby bottles - is "safe." In
laboratory studies BPA is consistently linked to obesity, developmental problems,
risk for heart attack, and breast and prostate cancer.

"The FDA's assessment relies on just two studies which were funded by
the American Chemistry Council (ACC:
29.09, -0.10, -0.34%). This ignores dozens of other studies done by independent
scientists which have found evidence of health consequences," says Dr.
Sarah Janssen, a physician and scientist with the Natural Resources Defense
Council (NRDC).

 

RECORDS SHOW FDA KNEW OF DISEASED PEPPERS BEFORE OUTBREAK

OMAHA, Neb., August 19, 2008 -- An Associated Press investigation
has found that the Food and Drug Administration was apparently aware that
diseased peppers were traveling to the U.S. border from Mexico months before
a salmonella outbreak.

FDA records show that border inspectors repeatedly
turned back dirty and diseased peppers.

More than 1,400 people have been sickened by Serrano peppers since
April.

 

TYPE 2 DIABETES LINKED TO ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER

MEDICAL RESEARCH NEWS, August 20, 2008 – Researchers in the U.S. say
they have found a link between arsenic and diabetes.

…The study found levels of arsenic were 26% higher in people with late-onset,
or type 2 diabetes than those without the disease.

The researchers say U.S.
government limits for drinking water are 10 micrograms of arsenic per liter,
which is exceeded in the water consumed by 13 million Americans living mostly
in rural areas that rely on wells to bring up ground water.