MORE H1N1 VACCINES RECEIVED: INFANT GIRL IS LATEST FATALITY

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November 20, 2009 (San Diego) -- The County’s six Public Health Centers and one immunization clinic have each received 200 additional doses of injectable H1N1 vaccine.

 

The limited vaccine is prioritized for use in the CDC priority groups of: children and young adults four to 24 years old; adults 25 to 64 years old with chronic medical conditions; household contacts of infants less than 6 months old; and health care workers. The vaccine will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Select clinics also have adult preservative-free vaccine available for pregnant women.

 

The majority of vaccine in San Diego County will be sent directly by the distributor to medical providers who see patients in the priority groups. Please contact your medical provider about getting the H1N1 flu vaccine if you are in one of the high risk groups. If your medical provider does not have vaccine, or you do not have a regular medical provider, please check with a Public Health Center about getting vaccinated. The centers are open Monday through Friday. Hours and locations can be found at www.sdcounty.ca.gov or by calling 2-1-1.

 

Private providers (hospitals, clinics, and medical offices) have begun to receive their H1N1 vaccines directly from the distributor. It is anticipated that additional vaccine will continue to arrive in San Diego County over the coming weeks and months.
 

 

On November 18, a four-,month-old healthy infant girl became the lateast victim to die of H1N1 flu. San Diego County has had 617 hospitalized cases of pandemic H1N1 Influenza to date. There have been 33 deaths of San Diego County residents associated with H1N1, plus four deaths of non-residents.
 

 

The general public is encouraged to stay home from work or school if they have influenza-like illness or symptoms similar to the seasonal flu which includefever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue. It is recommended that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone without the use of fever-reducing medicine.
 

 

Individuals with underlying medical conditions experiencing influenza-like illness or symptoms should contact their primary care physician in a timely manner.