OBAMA VETOES KEYSTONE PIPELINE

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East County News Service

February 28, 2015 (Washington D.C.)—President Barack Obama has vetoed the Keystone XL pipeline bill passed by the Republican-controlled Congress. In his veto message, he criticized the Congressional attempt to bypass his administration’s environmental review of the project and ““circumvent longstanding and proven processes for determining whether or not building and operating a cross-border pipeline serves the national interest.”

Republicans in Congress could seek to over-ride the veto, an action that would require two-thirds of both houses and is unlikely to succeed. 

Supporters of the project have cited job creation as their primary reason, along with meeting energy demands. Opponents have argued the project would be environmentally destructive, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and have argued for greater use of clean alternatives instead.

Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune issued a statement praising the veto, adding, “That’s what he said he’d do from the start, but Republicans in Congress continued to waste everyone’s time with a bill destined to go nowhere, just to satisfy the agenda of their big oil allies.”

But Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said, “I’m disappointed because I think the president is missing an opportunity when it comes to jobs and North American energy independence.”

The pipeline would bring tar sands from Canada to the Gulf coast ports, crossing Midwestern states in the U.S.  Despite the veto and unlikely prospects of an override, however, the project is not dead, since the Obama administration could potentially still approve—or reject-- the Keystone XL pipeline after the environmental review process is completed.

OBAMA VETOES KEYSTONE PIPELINE

East County News Service

February 28, 2015 (Washington D.C.)—President Barack Obama has vetoed the Keystone XL pipeline bill passed by the Republican-controlled Congress. In his veto message, he criticized the Congressional attempt to bypass his administration’s environmental review of the project and ““circumvent longstanding and proven processes for determining whether or not building and operating a cross-border pipeline serves the national interest.”

Republicans in Congress could seek to over-ride the veto, an action that would require two-thirds of both houses and is unlikely to succeed. 

Supporters of the project have cited job creation as their primary reason, along with meeting energy demands. Opponents have argued the project would be environmentally destructive, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions and have argued for greater use of clean alternatives instead.

Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune issued a statement praising the veto, adding, “That’s what he said he’d do from the start, but Republicans in Congress continued to waste everyone’s time with a bill destined to go nowhere, just to satisfy the agenda of their big oil allies.”

But Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) said, “I’m disappointed because I think the president is missing an opportunity when it comes to jobs and North American energy independence.”

The pipeline would bring tar sands from Canada to the Gulf coast ports, crossing Midwestern states in the U.S.  Despite the veto and unlikely prospects of an override, however, the project is not dead, since the Obama administration could potentially still approve—or reject-- the Keystone XL pipeline after the environmental review process is completed.