QUAIL BRUSH APPLICANT ASKS FOR ONE-YEAR SUSPENSION OF APPLICATION

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April 8, 2013 (San Diego's East County) - An attorney representing Quail Brush Genco, a subsidiary of Carlyle Infrastructure Partners, has submitted a letter to the California Energy Commission's siting committee today. The letter requests a one-year suspension of consideration on the proposed gas-fired Quail Brush power plant near Mission Trails Regional Park.

The announcement was hailed as "good news" in an e-mail from Preserve Wild Santee sent to opponents of the project, which has generated widespread community opposition. 

The applicant seeks a suspension of review without prejudice. This is not a withdrawal and the applicant seeks to reserve the right to reinstate the proceeding in a year. 

Comments

quail brush power plant

As intervenor in this project we must ask the CEC not to suspend thsi project but to Reject it completly!!! this is just a tactic to bring "fossil fuels" where "Renewables" are needed. This is 1950's technology! San Diego has a 2018 plan to be much more energy efficient and this project would have been contrary to that plan. 

Yay! :-)

As the sign in the photo says, "THIS PLACE MATTERS".

The people who stood their ground and persevered to get this message out also mattered!   Without them this project would have been a "slam dunk" as someone stated after the CPUC meeting.   My sincere thanks to everyone who took the time out of their busy schedules to defeat this project . . . for now!

GO SOLAR!

Good News ... for a Short Time

It's great that the energy company has been stopped, at least momentarily.  That should give us time to find alternative energy sources.  We need to escape centralized energy distribution and create more distributed energy sites.  Solar panels are now very affordable compared to a short time ago.  Installing solar panel everywhere will not only help keep the earth cooler but also deter cyberterrorism and cyberwarfare from interfering with our electrical systems.  Of course, it will also be less expensive to all of us than centralized power distribution models.  Wouldn't be great to be permanently off the SDG&E power grid?