October 2008 Articles

TAP INTO THE MAIN TAP TAVERN

Story and photos by Jolene Crowley

 

Courtesy of Main Tap Tavern.
Main Tap Tavern in El Cajon boasts 24 hand-blown glass tap handles created
by local artist Dan McStocker.

The
rehabilitation and beautification of Main Street in El Cajon continues with
the July opening of Main Tap Tavern.  Currently owned and operated by
the East County father and son team, T. L. and Zack Summers, this prime location
had been a dive bar since the ‘60s.

Editorial: Where is the Liberty Going?

The Loss of Freedom and the Slide towards Tyranny

By Michael Benoit

What is tyranny?

October 1, 2008 (San Diego's East County) - It is the taking control of your body, mind or property without your consent. Freedom
comes to us naturally and tyranny is a stripping away of that freedom. Our
freedom can be classified into two categories -- the first being personal,
and the second being economic.

These freedoms, of course, are joined, so a loss of one equates to a loss
of the other. I don't believe that there can ever be a consistent
level of freedom from one person to the next. For example, if the politicians
make it mandatory to wear a seatbelt, this is an infringement on our personal
liberty; if we are punished by the state for not wearing the belt, which usually
comes in the form of a fine which diminishes our economic freedom. To the wealthy
the loss of freedom is likely not to be perceived at all.

DRIVER SENTENCED FOR THREATENING PEACE ACTIVISTS IN RAMONA

By Miriam Raftery

September
23, 2008 (RAMONA) -
Keith Alan Davis, a Ramona man who drove his pickup
truck toward a group of anti-war protesters n June, has been sentenced to probation,
ordered to take anger-management classes and must perform 20 days of community
service.

“This is America. You can’t just go running people over, but let’s
not just hogtie people and throw them in prison, either,” said Dave Patterson,
organizer of the Ramona “Enough” anti-war protests held each Sunday
at noon in downtown Ramona and other County locations.  “If you
put him in jail, he can’t support his family,” added Patterson,
who believes the verdict is fair. “Maybe the guy driving can be rehabilitated.”

7 BANDS HOLD CONCERT TO HELP FIRE VICTIMS OCT 4

ROC For Fire Relief Concert and Fire Expo Helps Neighbors, Celebrates
Heroes

Saturday, October 4th, 2008
12:00pm to 10:00pm
Lakeside Rodeo Grounds, Lakeside
www.rocsd.net
Listen to music from
the bands.

 

October 1, 2008 (Lakeside) - “Relief is still needed in a serious way,” said Randy Seol of
the band Strawberry Alarm Clock, a longtime San Diego resident who watched
in horror with the rest of us as our county was ravaged by the 2003 and 2007
wildfires. Some fire survivors are now losing their FEMA trailers; many
are struggling in severe financial and emotional need to rebuild their lives,
he added. 

CHEAP CHIC: SAVOR A RESALE FASHION SHOPPING SPREE

By Miriam Raftery

September 22, 2008 (LA MESA) - If your budget is tight amid today’s rising prices, take heart! A fun way to shrink your clothing budget without sacrificing style is to treat yourself to a shopping spree in a delightful East County resale shop.

My personal favorite resale outlet is Act II, which has two stores in downtown La Mesa, both on La Mesa Blvd.

HUNDREDS FLOCK TO JULIAN BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL

By Miriam Raftery

September
21, 2008 (JULIAN) -
“We’ve
had at least 500 people here so far,” Dick Thilken, president of the Julian
Lions Club
said
of the 38th annual Julian Bluegrass Festival on Sunday afternoon, September
21st.  “Each day we’ve had six musical groups playing.” 

Besides
officially scheduled acts, players from various areas joined in for some impromptu
musical performances at California’s oldest bluegrass
festival.

PEOPLE POWER - WORLD'S LAST CASES OF POLIO?

Local Rotary Members Strive to End Global Scourge

By Miriam Raftery
October 1, 2008 (San Diego’s East County) -- Polio,
once the most dreaded childhood disease which killed or paralyzed millions
of people, may soon be eradicated worldwide – and members of local Rotary
chapters are eagerly pitching in to rid the globe of this silent killer.

THE ROLLING REVIEWER - AN ANTIQUE STORY

By Janelle Eckardt
October 1, 2008 (La Mesa) --  When considering a place and/or attraction in the East County to highlight from my perspective as a 20-something woman in a wheelchair, La Mesa’s long row of antique shops didn’t immediately rank high on my list. This is not to say that I don’t appreciate the fine crafts of generations past–I was raised in a household of jukeboxes, ice boxes, and radios the size of large robots–But after years of watching “The Antique Road Show” with my mother, I’m ashamed to say it is still beyond me to tell the difference between a hand-carved wooden horse from the nineteenth century and one carved in a middle school class by a kid with an acne problem.  So I decided to roll outside my comfort zone and head off on a modern day treasure hunt.

IN SEARCH OF THE GREAT PUMPKIN

Our Guide to East County Pumpkin Patches

Article and photos By Daisy Sharrock

Leon Thompson.
Bear Padilla checks out pumpkins at Bates Nut Farm.

There
is something wonderful about autumn. Even here in East County, where the temperature
dips only a fraction compared to much of the country, you can still feel a
tinge of crisp coolness ushering in the holiday season.  First
up on the holiday roster is my family’s hands-down favorite: Halloween.

Autumn makes me think of scarlet maple trees, pumpkin pie, grinning jack-o’-lanterns,
hay rides and corn mazes, yummy pumpkin pie, costumes, and did I mention the
delicious pumpkin pie? What’s not to love? This is family frolic at its
best.  Fortunately, East County has a great line-up of pumpkin patches
with activities to make even the gravest ghoul crack a smile.  So as your
family gets ready to indulge this Halloween, be sure to check out one (or more)
of these neighborhood pumpkin patches and join in the fun!

EDITORIAL - BLUETOOTH BLUES

By Miriam Raftery

October 1, 2008 (San Diego's East County) Legislators
who voted to ban cell phone usage while driving obviously never tried communicating
via a a hands-free device while traversing East County's back roads and
byways, where even normal cell phone service is spotty at best and often non-existent. I'm
certain that if these do-gooders in Sacramento had to conduct their business
in the boonies, they'd repeal the law in a nanosecond.

People Power - On the Trail With the Rock "Doc": Bringing Natural Science to Reservation Children

By Miriam Raftery


October 1, 2008 (Mesa Grande reservation) - Bouncing down a dusty dirt road with hairpin turns so narrow that we have to
honk our horn to warn oncoming drivers, we descend past Lake Sutherland into
a deep gorge.   We emerge in a hidden valley—home of the
lower Mesa Grande Indian reservation.  The most remote tribal village
in East County, Mesa Grande’s American Indians survived 19th century
attacks that decimated more accessible tribes. 

We park in front of the tribal tutoring center, which doubles as a fire station.   A
throng of smiling children quickly surrounds us, eager to greet Eleanora “Norrie” Robbins,
PhD—better known as “Doc.”

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