HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVIST TO SPEAK IN RAMONA ON DIFFERENCES BETWEEN ISLAM AND CHRISTIANITY

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East County News Service

June 10, 2017 (Ramona) – Nonie Darwish, a human rights activist, will speak on “The Difference between Biblical and Islamic Values” at a Ramona Tea’d forum on Saturday, June 24th.   Darwish was born and raised in Egypt as a Muslim, but converted to Christianity after moving to the United States.  She is an author, lecturer and Senior Fellow at the Center for Security Policy.

The free event will be held at the Ramona Lutheran Church, 520 Sixteenth St., Ramona. Doors open at 11 a.m.; program begins as 12 noon.

She is the author of three books: Now They Call Me Infidel; Why I Renounced Jihad for America, Israel and the War on Terror, Cruel and Usual Punishment: The Terrifying Global Implications of Islamic Law, and The Devil We Don't Know: The Dark Side of Revolutions in the Middle East. Darwish's speech topics cover human rights, with emphasis on women's rights and minority rights in the Middle East.  She is also the founder of the organization Arabs for Israel.

Ramona Tea’d is affiliated with the Tea Party movement, describing itself as a “nonpartisan, pro-Constitution Citizens Action Group.”  For details, visit www.RamonaTead.com.


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Comments

Ramona TEA-Where's the other point of view?

Nonie Darwish, I enjoyed your speech but in reply to your statements you make some huge generalizations which compound your mis-statements. Your speech is not gospel but just one point of view. Another view comes from religious scholars which if the Ramona group was really interested in learning, they could invite. But for for some strange reason the nice people there seem fearful to invite another point of view. Why is this, I wonder? Perhaps because they are frightened to hear another side. Your talk was interesting but the problem is there is not just ONE islam. Just as there is not just ONE Christianity. Feel free to invite presidential professor and chair of the Department of religious studies at the University of Oklahoma in Norman Oklahoma, Charles Kimball who wrote the book, 'Truth Over Fear -Combating the Lies about Islam'. For example on page 72 of his book, Prof Kimball writes: "Islam, Christianity, and all other major religious traditions are extraordinary diverse. None are monolithic. Be alert any time you hear someone say or find yourself saying Christians believe _____ fill in the blank. Stop and ask which Christianity? Do you mean Russian, Greek, Coptic, or Armenian Orthodox Christians? Are you referring to Quakers, Presbyterians, Baptist, Lutheran, or Methodist? Were you thinking of Roman, Maronite, or Syrian Catholics? Might you be speaking about Pentecostals in sub-Saharan Africa or snake handling Pentecostals the Appalachian Mountains? Or when someone says, "Christian believes one _____ " one can complete the statement with almost anything and it is sure to apply to some group of people who perceive themselves to be faithful followers of Jesus...When I teach undergraduate and graduate course on Islam, I make it a high priority for the class to grasp this truth and began to explore its multiple implications.

Difficulty understanding

Given that our President's represent our values both here and abroad, I have a difficult time understanding having seen our last three Presidents bow to the King of Saudi Arabia. In 2016 there were 150 beheadings there for a wide variety of reasons. Why do we give support to this Country and align ourselves with such a Monarchy? Simple, they support the US backed Petro-Dollar. If you play ball you get perked and even bowed before on camera with our blind eye given to their haneous indiscretions. If not, your the enemy of the state and subject to the Global Corporate War and Media Machine working together to take you down in the name of Democracy, Human Rights, and accuse you of terror while we and our allies rationalize being part of the killing of untold numbers of innocent civilians. Like it or not, it's on all of us.

Is the Center for Security Policy an extremist group?

The respected Southern Poverty Legal Center maintains an extensive research profile of hate groups, and lists the Center for Security Policy as an "extremist group" and a "a conspiracy-oriented mouthpiece for the growing anti-Muslim movement in the United States." Ironically, this event is being held at the Romana Lutheran Church. It was Martin Niemöller, himself a Lutheran Minister, who gave us one of the most cited quotations from the 20th century in reference to his experience with the Nazis: First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Socialist. Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Trade Unionist. Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out— Because I was not a Jew. Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.