HEAR OUR INTERVIEW: PALEONTOLOGIST TOM DEMÉRÉ SHARES NEW INSIGHTS INTO EARLY HUMAN ACTIVITY SIGNS AT LOCAL MASTADON DISCOVERY SITE

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May 27, 2017 (San Diego) --Dr. Tom Deméré, curator of paleontology and director of PaleoServices at the San Diego Natural History Museum, was our guest recently on the East County Magazine Show on KNSJ.   Deméré vigorously defended his team’s conclusions that  bones from an ancient mastodon skeleton found locally were broken and sharpened with stones onsite by early humans 130,000 years ago.  

Click the audio link to hear our full interview, and scroll down for highlights.

As we reported last month, that discovery has rocked the scientific world, since the previous earliest records of humans in the Americas date back only about 15,000 years. Those findings were published in the Journal of Nature, by 11 prominent scientific experts.

Since then, skeptics have emerged,  as often occurs with new scientific theories or findings.  On our show, Deméré addresses the skeptics’ arguments, such as one that questioned whether the bones may have been damaged not by humans, but by highway building equipment.  But the paleontology expert explained that construction was stopped after heavy equipment touched merely a small corner of the mastodon skeleton.

Audio: 

Interview with Dr. Tom Demere, San Diego Natural History Museum

Comments

Interesting and highly probable

Good interview and the main reason I visit this site. NOT to see re posts of political garbage from other sources.

I see no reason to doubt the potential for human activity especially around areas that would be useful. This is real science at work. L.ook at the evidence , debate, debate debate and see where it goes. The answers may never be clear, but that is why people search