urban runoff

RAIN BRINGS URBAN RUNOFF TO COUNTY BEACHES

January 25, 2013 (San Diego) – The Department of Environmental Health has issued a General Advisory for the coastal waters of San Diego County due to recent rainfall. Swimmers, surfers, and other ocean users are warned that the levels of bacteria can rise significantly in ocean and bay waters, especially near storm drains, creeks, rivers, and lagoon outlets that discharge urban runoff. Urban runoff may contain large amounts of bacteria from a variety of sources such as animal waste, soil, and decomposing vegetation. While many coastal storm drains within San Diego County are permanently posted with white metal warning signs, additional temporary warning signs are not posted for General Advisories. Activities such as swimming, surfing and diving should be avoided in all coastal waters for 72 hours following rain. This includes all coastal beaches and all of Mission Bay and San Diego Bay. Elevated bacteria levels can persist after a rainstorm depending upon the intensity of the storm, volume of runoff and ocean and current conditions.

RAIN BRINGS URBAN RUNOFF TO COUNTY BEACHES AND TIJUANA RIVER FLOWS TO SOUTH COUNTY BEACHES

October 12, 2012 (San Diego County) -- The Department of Environmental Health has issued a General Advisory for the coastal waters of San Diego County due to recent rainfall.  Swimmers, surfers, and other ocean users are warned that the levels of bacteria can rise significantly in ocean and bay waters, especially near storm drains, creeks, rivers, and lagoon outlets that discharge urban runoff.  Urban runoff may contain large amounts of bacteria from a variety of sources such as animal waste, soil, and decomposing vegetation.

RAIN BRINGS URBAN RUNOFF

 
Rain Brings Urban Runoff To County Beaches                       
    
March 26, 2012 (San Diego County) -- The Department of Environmental Health has issued a General Advisory for the coastal waters of San Diego County due to recent rainfall.  Swimmers, surfers, and other ocean users are warned that the levels of bacteria can rise significantly in ocean and bay waters, especially near storm drains, creeks, rivers, and lagoon outlets that discharge urban runoff. 

 

WATER CONSERVATION GARDEN AND COUNTY WATERSHED PROTECTION PROGRAM UNVEIL NEW EXHIBIT

 

October 2, 2011 (Rancho San Diego)—The Water Conservation Garden, in partnership with the San Diego County Watershed Protection Program, has opened a new exhibit that highlights storm water pollution prevention.  The  public is invited to view the new exhibit any time during its normal operating hours—9am-4pm, 7 days a week.  The new exhibit features a permeable pavement installation, complete with re-circulating fountain, situated alongside a straw bale house with a green, living roof.  Funding for the exhibit comes from a generous grant from the County of San Diego’s Watershed Protection Program.