wages

EAST COUNTY ROUNDUP: TOP LOCAL AND STATE NEWS

 

September 6, 2012  --  (San Diego’s East County)--East County Roundup highlights top stories of interest to East County and San Diego’s inland regions, published in other media. This week’s top “Roundup” headlines include:

LOCAL/REGIONAL

  • La Mesa-Spring Valley schools face cuts of $12.5 million  if tax vote fails (La Mesa Patch)
  • Wages in San Diego not rising fast enough (UT San Diego)
  • La Mesa City Council Candidates (La Mesa Courier)
  • 10 privatization fact checks (Voice of San Diego)
  • 21 homes red-tagged: What to expect from classic Brawley earthquake swarm  (NBC)
  • Recruiting allegations haunt Helix, defending state football champions (Mt. Helix Patch.com)

STATE

  • California jobs picture brightens (Sacramento Bee)
  • Gov. Brown promotes Prop 30, warns of devastating cuts to education if it fails (Santee Patch)
  • Most tax deals die as GOP stands united (UT San Diego)
  • Self-driving cars approved by California legislature (CNBC)
  • California way behind Germany in solar development (KCET)
  • Three races could tip the balance of power in state Legislature (Sacramento Bee)
  • U.S. Chamber launches ad attacking California budget, economy (Sacramento Bee)

Read more for excerpts and links to full stories.

PETERS MAKES CASE FOR ELECTABILITY IN NEW 52ND CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT

 
In exclusive interview with East County Magazine, Peters talks about key issues in our region
 
By Miriam Raftery
 
May 30, 2012 (San Diego) –“I’m the candidate with the best record of working across the aisle to get things done,”  says Scott Peters, a Democrat. He is  one of ten candidates vying for the new 52nd Congressional district seat currently held by Republican Brian Bilbray.

LIFE SCIENCES INDUSTRY SWEEPS LOW-PAID WORKERS UNDER THE RUG

 
Report: Janitors’ low wages a blotch on biotech's shining reputation
 
May 17, 2012 (San Diego) -- Janitors who clean the offices and laboratories of San Diego's highly profitable biotech companies generally aren't paid enough to live on, while their low wages are excluded from the industry's claims of creating good jobs.