criminal justice reform

BOARD IMPLEMENTS STATE LAW WAIVING CRIMINAL FEES

By Donnie Ryan, County of San Diego Communications Office
 
Photo credit: PublicDomainPictures.net
 
June 9, 2021 (San Diego) -- The San Diego County Board of Supervisors voted yesterday, June 8, to amend the County’s administrative code, the final step in fully implementing state legislation that eliminates the assessment and collection of criminal fees, prior to the law’s effective start date of July 1.
 
Also known as the “Family Over Fees Act,” State Assembly Bill 1869 was signed into law Sept. 18, 2020 by Gov. Gavin Newsom and made the state the first in the nation to repeal most criminal administrative fees and forgive associated debt.

RESTORATIVE JUSTICE BILL PASSES ASSEMBLY

 

 

East County News Service

May 29,2016 (San Diego's East County) -- AB 2590, the Restorative Justice bill authored by  Assemblymember Shirley Weber (D-San Diego)  passed the full Assembly last week

With a massive recidivism rate, it's time for more effective approach to public safety, Dr.    Weber believes. This bill provides an opportunity for the offender - with the consent of the victims or their families - to accept responsibility, acknowledge the harm to victims, make agreements to repair damage as much as possible, and clarify future intentions to reform.

EDITORIAL: THREE STRIKES:--THE IMPACT AFTER MORE THAN A DECADE...ENOUGH IS ENOUGH!

 

By the Judicial Reform Commitee, United African-American Ministerial Action Council

 

October 10, 2009 (San Diego)--The much ballyhooed Three Strikes laws have had a negligible impact on states' imprisoned populations since its enactment, with the notable exceptions of California, Florida, and Georgia.*  For most states and the federal government, Three Strikes' enactment appears to have been "much ado about nothing.” Their 1998 analysis of Three Strikes laws points out why this should come as no surprise -- every one of the states that enacted Three Strikes laws already had existing repeat offender laws on the books; for many of those states, the change affected by Three Strikes was marginal.

 

The exceptional impact is in California, the only state in which any felony offense can trigger a Three Strikes sentence. California Department of Corrections data report that nearly two-thirds (65%) of those sentenced under California's Three Strikes laws are imprisoned for nonviolent offenses.