power of attorney

ASK THE RETIREMENT CONCIERGE: CAN YOU CHANGE YOUR WILL YOURSELF?

 

By Sharon Ann Hamilton

Dear Retirement Concierge,

I am retired and fortunately have adequate resources. I just don’t believe in spending money if I don’t have to and it is not hard because I have chosen to live a simple life for many years now. I do have my estate documents in order: trust, will, health care directive, and power of attorney for financial matters should I be unable to act for myself. Here is the situation: I want to make a couple of small changes in beneficiary recipients. Someone told me I could just handwrite a codicil and put in in my trust documents. Is that true? Attorneys are pricy these days and if I can do it myself without risk, I will.

THE ATTORNEY'S CORNER: ADVANCE HEALTH CARE DECISION PLANNING

 

“Your source for Trusts, Wills, Probate, Family Law & more”

By: Stephen C. Ross, Esq.

May 16, 2013 (San Diego County) – Advance planning concerning your medical care decisions is important for both you and your family. It ensures your desires will be met while providing guidance to loved ones making difficult decisions regarding your care. People have varying opinions concerning what procedures to allow, medications to take, whether-or-not to prolong life and organ donation. Having an understanding of the terminology and decisions you may have to make will help ensure your wishes are met by those responsible for making your medical care decisions in the future.

THE ATTORNEY'S CORNER: POWERS OF ATTORNEY & ESTATE PLANNING

 

“Your source for Trusts, Wills, Probate, Family Law & more”

By Stephen C. Ross, Esq.

April 23, 2013 (San Diego County) – A power of attorney (POA) is a written document wherein a person (the principal) appoints another person (the agent) to transact business and manage property on behalf of the principal. A POA has many purposes in estate planning, including: allowing the agent to transfer property into a revocable trust that is the principal’s primary estate planning tool; facilitating gifts to take advantage of the federal annual gift tax exclusion; and, allowing the agent to operate the principal’s business that is not included in a trust.