The Black Book

THE BLACK BOOK: GRANDSON OF ADLAI STEVENSON OFFERS REFLECTIONS ON HISTORY, WIT, AND POLITICS

 

The Black Book: Lessons from American History – Abraham Lincoln to Modern China, by Senator Adlai E. Stevenson, III (The Stevenson Family, 2009, 299 pages).              

Book Review by Dennis Moore            

  “Once a man holds public office he is absolutely no good for honest work.” --Will Rogers

September 22, 2013 (San Diego’s East County)-- The Black Book: Lessons from American History – Abraham Lincoln to Modern China  is a guide-- a road map for future politicians authored by Adlai E. Stevenson III.  He  laments changes in the electoral process and the loss of civility in politics, also speaking of opportunities in politics being limited by money and a media which restricts comments to one or two minutes while focusing on the game, the trivial and the sensational.

The book began as a brown loose-leaf binder in which the author ‘s great-grandfather, Adlai E. Stevenson  (1835-1914), collected anecdotes and maxims, stories and sayings during his life as a county prosecutor, congressman, assistant postmaster general and U.S. vice president under Grover Cleveland. His grandson, known to friends and family as “the Guv,” expanded the collection in a large black binder during his life as an official in the Roosevelt and Truman administrations, governor of Illinois, Democratic presidential candidate in 1952 and 1956, and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations.