septic tanks

REAL ESTATE REALITY: WHERE, OH WHERE, DID OUR SEPTIC TANK GO? HOW TO AVOID A PORTA POTTY PROBLEM.

By Maryanne Jackson, real estate broker, CNE. CPRES. DRE#01784021

Photo: Creative Commons image via Free Stock

June 4, 2019 (San Diego’s East County) – Dear Maryanne,

My fiancé and I purchased our first home in December. We were told there was a septic tank on the property. We had asked our agent on numerous occasions to find out the exact location of the septic tank, but he never followed through with our request; he only told us, “The septic tank had recently been pumped therefore we really had no need to worry about it right now, we just needed to focus on closing the deal.”

Upon moving in we attempted to use the showers and toilets and noticed the water started to back up. We called numerous plumbers and the prior owner- who informed us that the septic had been renovated when the investor bought the property from her and did the flip.

We now are paying $200 a month for a porta potty rental; it is our only way to have a bathroom on our property until this gets resolved.

How could this situation have been avoided? Was there something we should have done while in escrow?

K. W. Blossom Valley

ANDERSON FIGHTS TO HALT NEW SEPTIC FEE: ASSEMBLY BILL WOULD REPEAL COSTLY NEW RULES

May 11, 2009 (Sacramento)--Gerry Giguere and his wife Kit live on a fixed income and don’t want to lose their home over a new septic regulation.

“This is big-government insanity,” said Gerry Giguere, whose home in rural east county requires a septic system and well.

California will soon impose a new fee of up to $650 for all septic tank owners. The fees would pay for mandatory inspections of all septic tanks and could force many to pay for costly upgrades, angering rural property owners who rely on septic systems.