HEALTH AND SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS

Printer-friendly versionPrinter-friendly version Share this

July 30, 2016 (San Diego's East County) -- Our Health and Science Highlights provide cutting-edge news that could impact your health and our future.

HEALTH

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

For excerpts and links to full stories, click “read more” and scroll down.

HEALTH

Zika cases likely transmitted locally in U.S.for first time, officials say (Bloomberg)

U.S. health officials said Friday that four cases of Zika virus were transmitted locally by mosquitoes in Miami, the first evidence of the virus spreading that way in the continental U.S.

9 plants that bug bugs—including mosquitoes (USA Today)

Summer is almost here, and you'll want to spend more time in your backyards and gardens. Unfortunately, so will the bugs.  And because of viruses such as Zika and West Nile, mosquitoes are a big concern. You can plant herbs and flowers that repel those bugs, including mosquitoes, and add a touch of beauty to your backyard.

List of possible Zika birth defects grows longer  (NPR)

… Research to be presented next week at a teratology conference in San Antonio, Texas, suggests that serious joint problems, seizures, vision impairment, trouble feeding and persistent crying can be added to the list of risks from Zika exposure in the womb… even when Zika-exposed babies are born without microcephaly and appear largely normal at birth they can go on to have health issues including seizures and developmental delays that only become apparent in the weeks and months after birth. The new work also reinforces recent findings that suggest the type of outcomes the babies experience also varies by what trimester their mothers were in when they were exposed to Zika—with few cases of microcephaly when mothers were exposed during the third trimester.

Bright, Bluish-White LED Streetlamps Disrupt Sleep Cycles, AMA Says (NPR)

The American Medical Association says some energy-efficient streetlamps interfere with circadian rhythms and also cause glare. It recommends that towns choose less intense, warmer-colored lights.

Unapproved stem cell therapies multiply (San Diego Union-Tribune)

At least 351 companies across the United States advertise unauthorized stem cell treatments at their clinics, exposing patients to potential harm. That's the conclusion of a comprehensive study that may be the first of its kind.

Vaccines Against HPV Really Do Prevent Cancers | (IFLScience)

A report in the Canadian Medical Association Journal has revealed that girls who received the Gardasil vaccination in 2008 are more than a quarter less likely to have cervical abnormalities that can lead to cancer than those who were not vaccinated.

Viral hepatitis 'kills as many as Aids or TB '(BBC)

Viral hepatitis is one of the leading causes of death and disability across the globe, killing as many people as Aids or TB, research published in the Lancet suggests.

Give HPV vaccine to boys to protect against cancers, experts say (Guardian)

With rates of human papilloma virus on the rise, it is vital to immunise males as well as females, researchers believe

New York reports first female-to-male Zika transmission via sex (Reuters)

 New York City's health department on Friday reported the first female-to-male transmission of the Zika virus, which is most typically spread by the bite of an infected mosquito.

 

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

One Step Closer to Turning Plastics Into Fuel (Smithsonian)

Researchers in California and China have discovered a new method for breaking polyethylene into liquid fuel and solid wax

A nonprofit group is cloning ancient trees to combat climate change (Business Insider)

At the foot of a giant sequoia in California's Sierra Nevada, two arborists stepped into harnesses then inched up ropes more than 20 stories into the dizzying canopy of a tree that survived thousands of years, enduring drought, wildfire and disease.

What happens to your online accounts when you die? (Web Trends)

As more people continue to jump on the latest social networking site or app to share their lives and interests with friends, dealing with the grim task of figuring out what to do with all the online accounts and social profiles of a deceased loved one is becoming more of a common situation that families are needing to face these days.

Microsoft ruling limits government access to data stored overseas (The Christian Science Monitor)

Tech advocates hailed the decision in a case over access to emails stored on data servers in Ireland as a boon for privacy rights in the Digital Age.

How tidal tugs cause earthquakes on San Andreas fault(CS Monitor)

USGS researchers found that low-frequency earthquakes in California corresponded to certain phases of the tidal cycle.

'Friendly' GMO Mosquitoes Knock Back Dengue Fever by 91 Percent (Reason)

 

While the Food and Drug Administration and Congress dither over what to do about the high probability that the Zika virus will start spreading via Aedes aegypti mosquitoes later this year, GMO mosquitoes are reducing their numbers dramatically in tests in Brazil.

World's Largest Air Purifier Is Trying to Clean Up China's Smoggy Skies (EyeOpener TV)

When artist Daan Roosegaarde visited Beijing in 2014, he was inspired by what he didn't see. From his hotel room on the 32nd floor, his view of the sprawling Chinese capital was totally obscured by smog. "It was all gone," Roosegaarde says. "The city was completely covered with smog."

BMW's recycled electric car batteries to power homes (CS Monitor)

The German automaker says it will soon recycle the battery cells of its i3 electric vehicle by installing them in homes, providing a family with enough electricity for up to two days. The company says it will offer a standalone energy storage system in the near future

India launches 20 satellites at one go; most to serve U.S. customers (Reuters)

India successfully launched 20 satellites in a single mission on Wednesday, with most of them set to serve international customers as the South Asian country pursues a bigger share of the $300 billion global space industry.