methane gas

UNEXPECTED CULPRIT - WETLANDS AS A SOURCE OF METHANE

Knowing how emissions are created can help reduce them

East County News Service

Photo:  Undergraduate student Cain Silvey checking methane concentration in a field mesocosm with swamp milkweed in Dayton, Ohio that was part of the constructed wetland research area. The blue plastic tubes protect tree seedlings that are part of a different restoration project. Photo credit: Karla Jarecke

June 19, 2019 (San Diego’s East County) - Wetlands are an important part of the Earth’s natural water management system. The complex system of plants, soil, and aquatic life serves as a reservoir that captures and cleans water. However, as cities have expanded, many wetlands were drained for construction. In addition, many areas of land in the Midwest were drained to increase uses for agriculture to feed a growing world.

STATE MOVES TO REDUCE METHANE LEAKS THAT FUEL CLIMATE CHANGE

 

By Suzanne Potter, Public News Service

Photo:  A new rule from the California Public Utilities Commission will require more inspections of gas distribution systems in order to reduce leaks. (Wikimedia Commons)

October 15, 2018 (San Francisco) - The state's gas utility companies are going to have to spend about $300 million over the next three years to find, fix and prevent leaks of methane gas in their distribution systems – the result of a decision made by the California Public Utilities Commission on Thursday.