San Francisco Bay

EARTHTALK(R): CALIFORNIA'S CURRENT WATER CRISES IS MAN-MADE PHENOMENON

 

Earthjustice attorney says tough questions need to be Asked

Originally Published on the ECOreport

By Roy L Hales

May 11, 2015 (San Diego's East County) - According to Earthjustice attorney Trent Orr, California’s current water crisis is a man-made phenomenon. It is the outcome of the mid 20th century notion that equates progress with giant public works projects and assumes that we can engineer our way out of all sorts of problems, including living on a drought-prone state. This doesn’t work.

AKRAM: DAUGHTER OF IRAN, A MOTHER'S LOVE FOR HER DAUGHTER

 

Akram, by Akram Arastehjoo (The Scriptory, Stacy Thunes Krieger, Menlo Park, California, 2014, 115 pages).

Screenplay Review by Dennis Moore

January 7, 2015 (San Diego's East County) - Akram Arastehjoo, a descendant of the great Persian Empire, which we now know as Iran, tells her own and personal family story that encapsulates the long and illustrious history of kings and queens, in a screenplay written by Stacy Thunes Krieger, Akram. The author actually derives her name from the Holy Quran; meaning generosity, or “most generous.” This is pointed out by Krieger in this well-written and warm story.  Arastehjoo is unabashed in her pride for everything that is Persian, and rightfully so. It comes across in my interview of the author and throughout the story. I have been made aware that Iran actually converted from the original name of Persia to Iran in 1935, but it did take some getting used to. Many seem to prefer that bygone era of Persia, and all it stood for, including the iconic Darius the Great.

NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISTS SOUGHT FOR ARTWORK ON ANZA HISTORIC TRAIL: DEC. 31 DEADLINE

 

November 6, 2014 (San Diego's East County) - The California Indian Heritage Center Foundation is calling for Native American artists to produce new visual artwork that shares the Native Californian perspective of the Anza Expedition of 1775-76 and its impact. The visual art will enter the collection of the California Indian Heritage Center Foundation for display and interpretation. It will also be used by the National Park Service for education and interpretation of multiple perspectives of the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail.