London

A LONG WAY FROM JAMAICA WEST INDIES!

 

 

Driven: When Obstacles Take Center Stage , by Magetta Chantiloupe (Austin Macauley Ltd., London, England, 2014, 379 pages).

“Keep guard over your eyes and ears as the inlets of your heart, and over your lips as the outlet, lest they betray you in a moment of unawareness.”

Anne Bronte, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

Book Review by Dennis Moore

March 4, 2015 (San Diego) - Looking from the outside at Magetta Chantiloupe and all that she has accomplished in life, one would think that this San Diego resident and author of Driven: When Obstacles Take Center Stage, has always had it together. But looks would be deceiving, as this Certified Financial Planner with the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards – retired General Stock Broker and native of Jamaica West Indies, and mother of four adult children has fought and struggled to attain all that she has accomplished. Also the author of Iraq: The War That Shouldn’t Be – You Decide, Chantiloupe has been a world traveler – she has cruised the world, 41 of which were on the CUNARD Line. Her actual achievements and overall story could fill several books.

CUYAMACA COLLEGE COACH HAS TRIO OF OLYMPIC-BOUND PROTÉGÉS

Two-time Olympian race walker a mentor to next generation of athletes
 
July 6, 2012 (El Cajon) -- Cuyamaca College cross-country coach Tim Seaman, a two-time Olympian race walker, will be traveling to the Games in London, but this time it will be as a coach instead of as a competitor.

Athletes competing in the  men’s 20,000-meter race walk at the U.S. Olympic Trials in Oregon last week included, from left, Tyler Sorensen;  Cuyamaca College graduate Nick Christie; Cuyamaca College cross country coach Tim Seaman, and the winner of the 12-man race and the lone qualifier for the London Games, Trevor Barron.  Seaman, who has competed twice in the Olympics, is the coach for these three young athletes.

LEDERER ON LANGUAGE

 
What the Dickens!

by Richard Lederer   
courtesy of San Diego WriteWay 

February 1, 2012 (San Diego) -- Two centuries ago—on February 7, 1812—Charles John Huffam Dickens entered the earthly stage. Born into an impoverished family, his father having served a term in debtor's prison, Charles, worked as a child slave in a London blacking factory.

The rags-to-riches life of Charles Dickens's was more remarkable than any of his stories. From such unpromising origins, he arose to become the best-selling writer of his time and one of the most enduring and quotable writers of all time.