Idle No More

A QUEST FOR UNITY: JOURNEY OF NISHIYUU AND CANADA’S FIRST NATION’S LAND MANAGEMENT REGIME

Editor's note: This is a victory born in the Idle No More Movement for Native rights, which has spread from Canada to the U.S. ECM recently covered Idle No More speakers in San Diego, including local Kumeyaay members.  

By Sarah Hales-Ried (reprinted with permission of San Diego Loves Green)

http://www.sandiegolovesgreen.com/articles/a-quest-for-unity-journey-of-nishiyuu-canadas-new-land-management-regime/

March 28, 2013 (Ottaway, Canada)--After over two months and 1600 kilometres (approx. 994 miles) of walking, the journey of Nishiyuu  - a Cree word meaning “the people” - reached Cam-nada's Parliament Hill, in Ottawa, on Monday, March 25. That same day, Bernard Valcourt, Minister of Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development, formally welcomed eight First Nation communities into Canada's First Nations Land Management regime.

IDLE NO MORE MOVEMENT FOR NATIVE RIGHTS, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS REACHES SAN DIEGO

 

Speakers see parallels between destruction by energy companies in our region to environmental degradation, erosion of protections for people around the world

By Miriam Raftery

January 31, 2013 (San Diego) – Idle No More, a movement for the rights of indigenous people and environmental protections that began in Canada, has spread around the world and has now taken root here in San Diego.  Earlier this month,  members of local Native American tribes met convened at a forum sponsored by Activist San Diego to share their concerns and invite all people to join the movement.

“We must stand up to unite, to respect the Mother Earth,” Dennis  Alto, a Viejas tribal member, said.  “We are not just addressing the red nations; we are addressing all people.”

The Idle No More movement arose in Canada as a protest against the Canadian Government passing bills which enabled the government to control lands reserved for native people and reduce environmental protections for lakes and rivers.  Tar sands, pollution from mining and other sources are polluting  the waters and the lands.  Tribal members draw parallels to what is happening in the U.S., where mining, dams, and now large-scale wind and solar projects are ravaging the environment , destroying cultural resources and the way of life for many indigenous Americans.