military sexual assault

SENATE BILL AIMS TO CRACK DOWN ON SEXUAL ASSAULT IN MILITARY

 

By Miriam Raftery

November 18, 2013 (Washington D.C.) -- A battle is brewing in the U.S. Senate over a proposal aimed at protecting women in the military from sexual assault.

According to the Defense Department, REPORTS of sexual assaults shot up 46 percent in the last budget year, with 3,353 complaints filed from October through June.

But Senator Kirsten Gillebrand points out that an anonymous survey of military personnel conducted by the Pentagon found that the 26,000  said they were sexually assaulted last year. Senator Gillebrand says most sexual assaults were not reported because victims didn’t trust the chain of command or feared retaliation. So she is proposing to strip commanders of authority to prosecute cases of sexual assault, instead handing off these cases to experienced military lawyers outside the chain of command.

HEARING SET TUESDAY ON MILITARY JUSTICE IMPROVEMENT ACT

 

Senator Boxer seeks “citizen cosponsors” for landmark legislation to protect sexual assault victims

June 1, 2013 (Washington D.C.) – The House Armed Services Committee on Tuesday is expected to hear the Military Justice Improvement Act, a bill sponsored by 17 members of Congress including Senator Barbara Boxer (D-California), who is asking the public to support  the measure by becoming citizen cosponsors here.

The number of sexual assaults in the U.S. military rose by 35% from 2010 to 2012, according to a Defense Department report which found 26,000 members of the military had been victims of sexual assault – 70 assaults a day. Yet only 10% were even reported, and far fewer were prosecuted. 

Demands for reform have been fueled by two assaults in May in which military sex prevention officers were themselves charged with sexual abuse and other cases in which general overturned guilty verdicts in sexual assault cases.