Typhoon Haiyan

SAN DIEGO FILIPINOS HELP TYPHOON VICTIMS

 

By Jordan Schaffner

Photo: USaid.gov

November 26, 2013 (San Diego)--Many Filipinos live and work in San Diego County.  Some of them have relatives back home in the Philippines who have been affected by the tragic typhoon Haiyan (which translates in English as typhoon Yolanda)  that hit a few weeks ago.

In an interview with East County Magazine, Rex Mortensen, a local recruiter with American Solar Direct, said he has several dozen family members in the hard-hit city of Tacloban, where he was born and raised until age 8. 

“All but one of my family members have been found," he said, but added that "odds are not good” due to current conditions; all of their homes have been destroyed and their belongings are gone. “They are hungry, thirsty, severely injured and with only the clothes on their backs, are trekking up to Manila to relocate and live permanently with our aid.”

3 LOCAL REPRESENTATIVES URGE PROTECTED STATUS FOR PHILIPPINE NATI ONALS IN U.S. IN WAKE OF TYPHOON HAIYAN

November 22, 2013 (San Diego) -- Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-San Diego) led a delegation letter calling on the Department of Homeland Security to temporarily halt the deportation of Filipino nationals because of the devastating impact Super Typhoon Haiyan has had on the Philippines.

“It would be irresponsible to send individuals into a situation with the level of destruction and suffering occurring in the Philippines right now,” said Davis. “I hope acting Secretary Beers will recognize the gravity of this situation and provide some certainty and relief to those who may be facing deportation.”

Davis and several her House colleagues, including local Democratic representatives Juan Vargas and Scott Peters, asked for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Filipino nationals in the U.S.  TPS is designed to protect individuals from being sent home to countries that may be too dangerous for them to return. It would also grant them permission to work in the U.S. 

THOUSANDS FEARED DEAD FROM TYPHOON IN PHILIPPINES

 

News hits hard in San Diego, home to second most Filippinos in nation

By Miriam Raftery

November 10, 2013 (San Diego) -- The International Red Cross estimates that as many as 10,000 people may have been killed by a powerful typhoon that has struck the Philippines. Haiyan, also known as Yolanda in the Philippines, may be the strongest typhoon in history.

The typhoon generated winds three and a half times more powerful than Hurricane Katrina. It also triggered a storm surge 16 feet high. Nearly a thousand deaths have been confirmed so far.

The news is hitting hard locally.  With 182,000 Filippino residents, san Diego has the second largest Filippino population of any city in America, according to the 2010 census.