New York Times

ASK AN AUTHOR: INTERVIEW WITH NY TIMES BEST-SELLING AUTHOR EILEEN GOUDGE

 

by Sarka-Jonae Miller

December 18, 2015 (San Diego's East County) - New York Times best-selling author and former La Jolla resident Eileen Goudge drops by to answer her favorite reader question and a few of mine. Goudge is the author of more than a dozen books, including Garden of Lies, Trail of Secrets, Thorns of Truth, Such Devoted Sisters, The Replacement Wife, and her latest novel Bones and Roses.

READER'S EDITORIAL: BLACK JURORS NEED NOT APPLY

 

By Roderick T. Long, Creative Commons license

October 27, 2015 (San Diego's East County) - If you’re black, you may have trouble getting on to a jury.

The way in which jurors are chosen in the United States is intended to ensure an unbiased jury; and part of that process is the right of “peremptory challenge,” by which the prosecution and the defense are each allowed to reject a certain number of potential jurors without having to prove them unfit. But some prosecutors, especially in the southern states, appear to be using this procedure not to prevent bias but to guarantee it. (“Exclusion of Blacks From Juries Raises Renewed Scrutiny,” New York Times, 16 August 2015).

DEJA VU: PRELUDE TO MICHAEL BROWN AND FERGUSON, MISSOURI

 

The Lynching of Cleo Wright, by Dominic J. Capeci, Jr. (The University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 1998, 274 pages).

Book Review by Dennis Moore

August 25, 2014 (San Diego's East County) - Terry Teachout, a New York Times critic, playwright, and inveterate blogger, and I have something in common. He and I were both born in the “bootheel” of Missouri, he in Sikeston and I in Charleston – in the area of one of the most tragic and heinous lynchings in the annals of America; the lynching of Cleo Wright. We both, also have weighed in on Dominic J. Capeci’s book; The Lynching of Cleo Wright, which has been described as “a creatively conceptualized anatomy of a lynching, and “Capeci places the lynching of Cleo Wright within the context of the city of Sikeston, the state of Missouri, and the nation.” This book should also be viewed in context with the ongoing furor and debate of Ferguson, Missouri and the shooting death of unarmed black teenager Michael Brown by a white policeman.