Chaldeans

THOUSANDS CELEBRATE AKITU, CHALDEAN NEW YEAR TRADITION, IN EL CAJON

 

 

By Miriam Raftery

April 8, 2013 (El Cajon ) – In Babylon 7,313 years ago, Chaldea became the first nation to celebrate Akitu, a New Year Festival heralding the arrival of spring and the renewal of life.   Yesterday the tradition continued in El Cajon’s Prescott Promenade Park, where thousands of local Chaldeans turned out to celebrate the ancient tradition.   View a video: http://youtu.be/YfeKE22-wXw

“We are doing it to celebrate and have some fun with other, and to keep remembering,” Wissam Gello, a local Iraqi Chaldean told ECM.  “Our children will keep doing this every year, to remember and tell the truth.”

EAST COUNTY ROUNDUP: TOP LOCAL AND STATE NEWS

 
January 18, 2012 --  (San Diego’s East County)--East County Roundup highlights top stories of interest to East County and San Diego’s inland regions, published in other media.  This week’s top “Roundup” headlines include:
   

 
 
 
 
STATE
  • California lawmakers take another crack at single payer healthcare bill (Sacramento Bee)
  • Jerry Brown’s budget demands would strip demands, payments from local governments (Sacramento Bee)
  • Education magazine gives California a “C” for its students (Sacramento Bee)
  • California in eye of Internet piracy storm (San Francisco Chronicle)
 
LOCAL

  • Can $20 a head “cash mobs” save local shops? (U-T San Diego)
  • E. County leaders like their politics unbuttoned (U-T San Diego)
  • Parents protest, but are told school attendance boundaries won’t change (La Mesa Patch)
  • San Diego County Water Authority challenges rate (KPBS)
  • Stuck in traffic, long awaited Park Place project awaits fifth study (La Mesa Patch)
  • Chaldeans launch community newspaper (U-T San Diego)
  • Chickens finally okayed in Santee (U-T San Diego)
  • 5 involved in Sweetwater District probe plead not guilty (10 News)
  • Sweetwater says workers stole from cafeterias (U-T San Diego)
  • Campaign limits proposed for Southwestern and San Diego Schools (U-T San Diego)
 Scroll down for excerpts and links to full stories.

CHALDEAN CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION DEC. 18 IN EL CAJON

 

December 18, 2010 (El Cajon) – Christmas on Prescott, a unique Chaldean Christmas Celebration, will be held Saturday, December 18 from 1-5 p.m. on Prescott Promeande in downtown El Cajon. The event will feature Christian Arabic carols and music, English carols and music, skits, Santa Claus, face painting, balloons, and more. In addition, downtown stores and restaurants are open while you enjoy the free Holly Jolly Trolley around downtown, strolling Christmas carolers, and merchant specials.

IRAQI CHRISTIANS IN EAST COUNTY TO HOLD PRAYER GATHERING TONIGHT IN REMEMBRANCE OF THOSE KILLED BY AL QAEDA IN NOV. 1 ATTACK DURING MASS SERVICE IN IRAQ

 

November 3, 2010 (San Diego's East County) – East County’s Iraqi Christians will hold a prayer gathering tonight from 5-6:30 p.m. in the Prescott Promenade at 201 East Main Street, El Cajon.

 

A crowd of 500 or more is expected to attend the gathering, which is held in remembrance of Iraqi Christians massacred November 1st in an Al Qaeda attack on a Catholic church in Iraq.

SUMMIT SEEKS HELP FOR GROWING REFUGEE POPULATION IN EAST COUNTY

Nearly 85% of local refugees are from war-torn Iraq, straining resources on schools and social services; local leaders call for major changes in treatment of refugees

 

"We can create a national model," -- Sunny Cooke, president, Grossmont College

 

November 12, 2009 (El Cajon) – Impacts of the Iraq War are hitting home in East County, where so many Iraqi refugees have settled that El Cajon's mayor has dubbed a section of his community "Little Baghdad."  From Oct. 1, 2008 to October 1, 2009, the U.S. admitted almost 75,000 refugees—including 18,333 from Iraq.*  Since October 2008, San Diego has been taking in 400 refugee families a month.  Nearly 85% are from Iraq.  Almost 75% of all area refugees have settled in the Grossmont-Cuyamaca Community College District (GCCCD), straining resources beyond capacity in social services, education, and healthcare.

 

“Social Services predicts that 200 to 300 new families will be entering East County each month for the next two or three years,” Mike Lewis, PhD, assistant superintendent of education for the Grossmont Union High School District said at a November 6 summit at Cuyamaca College titled Spotlight on Refugee Education and Employment.  Some have spent weeks or even years in refugee camps.  Many don’t speak English and have not been able to receive an education.  Many refugees are also physically maimed by war or suffer post-traumatic stress.  Often they receive misinformation and find steep barriers to getting the help that they need.

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