Edward Snowden

SAN DIEGO CONGRESSIONAL MEMBERS VOTE TO DEFEAT MEASURE THAT SOUGHT TO STOP NSA SPYING ON AMERICANS' PHONE AND INTERNET RECORDS

 

By Miriam Raftery

July 25, 2013 (San Diego) –An amendment that sought to ban the National Security Agency from collecting phone and Internet records on Americans who are not under investigation failed to win passage in the House of Representatives today.  The Amash amendment, a bipartisan proposal to a spending bill,  was narrowly defeated 205-217.

 All five members of the San Diego Congressional delegation voted to defeat the measure including Republicans Duncan Hunter and Darrell Issa as well as Democrats Juan Vargas, Susan Davis, and Scott Peters.

Supporters of the amendment argued that the NSA overstepped its authority by conducting warrantless spying on citizens--activities never authorized by Congress and that some contend violates the Constitution.

HUNTER CALLS FOR AUDIT OF FEDERAL AGENCIES ON PROCESS OF CLASSIFYING DOCUMENTS

 

July 24, 2013 (Washington D.C.) – Congressman Duncan Hunter (R-El Cajon) has raised concerns over how federal agencies determine what materials will be classified and who will have access.  In a newsletter to constituents, Hunter suggested that “classification inflation” has occurred.

“In the ongoing debate on the activities of the National Security Agency, the abundance of classified documentation is one issue among others that demands further scrutiny,” Hunter’s newsletter states. “An excess of classified information and documents have required that the federal government issue more security clearances, without always taking the depth or context of information into account.  In some cases, the classification system is used to withhold information from the public and sometimes even Members of Congress.”

EDITORIAL: INTELLIGENCE SURVEILLANCE IS ERODING OUR PRIVACY AND LIBERTY

 

The troubling history of  our U.S. shadow factory -- and how we have lost rights in the name of security                                           

By Nadin Abbott

June 13, 2013 (San Diego) Edward Snowden shook the power elites in Washington D.C. with his revelations that the National Security Agency (NSA) is spying on Americans. He released documents such as the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA) order to the British newspaper, The Guardian, sending high-level U.S. government officials demanding his prosecution.