privacy

VIDEO CAMERAS TO STOP DRUG THEFTS AT GROSSMONT HOSPITAL RAISE QUESTIONS OVER PRIVACY OF SURGICAL PATIENTS

 

 

By Miriam Raftery

Photo: Pixabay stock image

May 7, 2016 (La Mesa) – When drugs began disappearing off anesthesia carts in the Women’s Health Center at Sharp Grossmont Hospital, the hospital installed hidden video cameras to catch the purported thief, an anesthesiologist, the surveillance revealed.  But the videos, shot over a year from mid-July 2012 to July 2013, also included images of women undergoing surgery. 

A KPBS iNewsSource investigation reported that some experts raised concerns over medical privacy, suggesting the hospital may have violated the law.  The hospital defends its action and contends that no privacy rights were violated. 

EDITORIAL: INTELLIGENCE SURVEILLANCE IS ERODING OUR PRIVACY AND LIBERTY

 

The troubling history of  our U.S. shadow factory -- and how we have lost rights in the name of security                                           

By Nadin Abbott

June 13, 2013 (San Diego) Edward Snowden shook the power elites in Washington D.C. with his revelations that the National Security Agency (NSA) is spying on Americans. He released documents such as the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA) order to the British newspaper, The Guardian, sending high-level U.S. government officials demanding his prosecution.

BLM'S INVASION OF PRIVACY SUPPRESSES FREE SPEECH, GROUP WARNS

 
BLM places "outrageous conditions on public comment" by releasing personal contact information online
 
June 2, 2012 (San Francisco) -- Protect Mustangs, a Bay Area-based preservation group, asks the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to revise its conditions for receiving written comment. The BLM now requires personal identifying information that BLM says it cannot safeguard, the group cautions.
 
What started as an issue jeopardizing public process for people who want helicopters roundups to stop has mushroomed into a free speech issue for all Americans.

CONGRESSWOMAN SUSAN DAVIS INTRODUCES BILL TO END ABSENTEE BALLOT RESTRICTIONS

July 18, 2011 (Washington) -- Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-San Diego) has introduced legislation, the Universal Right to Vote by Mail Act (H.R. 2084), that would end restrictions many states impose on a person’s ability to vote by absentee ballot. 

 
Currently, 21 states restrict an eligible voter’s ability to vote by mail, also known as absentee.  The other states offer no-excuse absentee voting.  Congresswoman Susan Davis (D-San Diego) re-introduced her bill to end such restrictions and allow all eligible voters nationwide to vote by mail for any reason in federal elections.