tar sands

CONGRESS APPROVES KEYSTONE PIPELINE; DECISION NOW RESTS WITH OBAMA

June 3, 2013 (San Diego’s East County) – The House and Senate have approved the controversial Keystone Pipeline, sending the measure to President Barack Obama’s desk.  The President faces mounting pressure from major campaign contributors urging him to veto the measure due to its negative environmental and climate change impacts; others urge support to create jobs.

Local representatives split down party line, with Republicans Duncan Hunter and Darrell Issa voting for the pipeline, while Democrats Susan Davis, Scott Peters and Juan Vargas voted against it.

The pipeline project sparked protests nationally and in San Diego (photo, left).

BLACK GOLD: THE RUSH IS ON--BUT AT WHAT PRICE TO COMMUNITIES AND OUR ENVIRONMENT?

 

By Miriam Raftery

April 21, 2013 (San Diego) – “Another scourge is beginning in California,” environmental activist Peg Mitchell told audience members at a forum on environmental justice issues hosted by Activist San Diego on April 15.  That “scourge”  is fracking – and in California, it’s all about extracting oil, not natural gas. 

To frack for oil requires millions of gallons of water –a precious commodity in Cailfornia.  It also means injecting toxic chemicals that corporations are not required to disclose due to the “Halliburton Law” pushed through by former Vice President Dick Cheney. 

The public doesn’t have a right to know where fracking is occurring or where its waste products will be dumped—even though fracking can cause earthquakes, disturb radioactive substances in the earth, reinject contaminated water into wells, and potentially pollute thousands of miles of coastline.

So why the push to frack for oil in California?

LOCAL OFFICIALS REACT TO OBAMA’S DECISION TO REJECT KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE

 
By Serena Scaglione

 
February 1, 2012 (San Diego)--President Obama’s decision denying a permit to construct a controversial pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico has fueled strong responses.  Now local representatives offer their views on the project, which pits calls for construction jobs and  a domestic energy supply against potentially serious environmental and health impacts.