anxiety

SIX TIPS FOR BEATING THE BLUES AND MANAGING YOUR DEPRESSION

By Stanley Popovich

December 17, 2020 (San Diego’s East County) -- With the COVID-19 pandemic resulting in increased stress, anxiety and fear, it can be challenging to manage your depression and other mental health issues.  

As the shutdowns and quarantines drag on, many people are at the end of their rope and do not know what to do. Nowadays, depression and fear is the norm.

Here are some techniques that a person can use to help manage their depression and loneliness during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

1. Challenge your negative thinking with positive statements and realistic thinking: When encountering thoughts that make you fearful or depressed, challenge those thoughts by asking yourself questions that will maintain objectivity and common sense. Focus on the reality of your situation and not on your thoughts.

 

MENTAL HEALTH IN A COVID-19 WORLD: HOW TO GET HELP

 
Part I in a two-part series
 
By Dr. Helen Horvath
 
Photo, left: isolation during COVID-19 has increased stress, anxiety and depression (Creative Commons image via Bing)
 
July 29, 2020 (San Diego’s East County) – COVID-19 has substantially changed our world, along with our relationships. Isolation due to quarantine and lockdowns, stress over loss of a job or loved one, has further exacerbated mental health conditions ranging from depression to anxiety. 

NEW RESEARCH: HIGH LEVELS OF ANXIETY FOUND AMONG SYRIAN REFUGEE CHILDREN

 

Source: American Psychiatric Association

Photo by Rachel Williams: Syrian refugee girls in El Cajon

May 21, 2017 (San Diego) -- The Syria Civil War has exposed millions of civilians to extreme physical and emotional trauma. Anxiety is common among Syrian refugee children, affecting more than four in five children, according to research presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association in San Diego.

NEW REPORT: BIG JUMP IN MENTAL HEALTH-RELATED CALLS TO LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT

 

East County News Service

June 9, 2016 (San Diego) -- Over the past six years, law enforcement agencies throughout the region have seen an 84 percent increase in the number of calls for service that stem from mental health issues, according to new data compiled by the San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG) Criminal Justice Research Division.

SAN DIEGO’S HIGH SUICIDE RATES—AND HOW TO GET HELP

 

By Nadin Abbott
 
March 1, 2012 (San Diego) -- One San Diegan commits suicide every day. We read of the most spectacular cases in the press, but on average, 365 local residents take their own lives. According to the County, “…as a cause of non-natural death, suicide ranks second, behind only drug/alcohol overdoses, and ahead of motor vehicle crashes.” http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/hhsa/programs/phs/documents/CHS-SuicideReport_2011.pdf