Kumeyaay

IDLE NO MORE MOVEMENT FOR NATIVE RIGHTS, ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS REACHES SAN DIEGO

 

Speakers see parallels between destruction by energy companies in our region to environmental degradation, erosion of protections for people around the world

By Miriam Raftery

January 31, 2013 (San Diego) – Idle No More, a movement for the rights of indigenous people and environmental protections that began in Canada, has spread around the world and has now taken root here in San Diego.  Earlier this month,  members of local Native American tribes met convened at a forum sponsored by Activist San Diego to share their concerns and invite all people to join the movement.

“We must stand up to unite, to respect the Mother Earth,” Dennis  Alto, a Viejas tribal member, said.  “We are not just addressing the red nations; we are addressing all people.”

The Idle No More movement arose in Canada as a protest against the Canadian Government passing bills which enabled the government to control lands reserved for native people and reduce environmental protections for lakes and rivers.  Tar sands, pollution from mining and other sources are polluting  the waters and the lands.  Tribal members draw parallels to what is happening in the U.S., where mining, dams, and now large-scale wind and solar projects are ravaging the environment , destroying cultural resources and the way of life for many indigenous Americans.

KUMEYAAY PLANT LORE AND USES TOUR DEC. 1

November 29, 2012 (El Cajon) – A Native Plant Garden Tour will take place in the Water Conservation Garden at Cuyamaca College, 12122 Cuyamaca College Dr. West, El Cajon on December 1 at 10:30 a.m.  The Native Plant tour, guided by Garden Docent, Jan Tubiolo, explores the lifestyle of the Kumeyaay Indians in southern California and the tremendous role native plants played in every aspect of their lives.

HARPIST MAIR RATHBURN TO PERFORM CENTENNIAL CONCERT AT EL CAJON LIBRARY AUG. 12

 
July 30, 2012 (El Cajon) -- Singer and harpist Mair Rathburn brings her musical fun in vintage costume to the El Cajon Library, 201 E. Douglas Av, in a family friendly concert Sunday, August 12, at 2 p.m. The free concert is part of the San Diego County Library Acoustic Showcase series, and is sponsored by the Friends of the El Cajon Library.
 
Rathburn is a historical interpreter at the Cosmopolitan Hotel in San Diego's Old Town State Park, so it piqued her interest when, at a previous Acoustic Showcase concert, she saw the library's mural depicting the history of El Cajon.  As the year 2012 celebrates the Centennial of the City of El Cajon, Rathburn was inspired to return to the library with a musical, historical version of the mural.

ANTHONY PICO, SWORN IN AS NEW VIEJAS LEADER, PLEDGES NATION-BUILDING

 

February 11, 2011 (Alpine) – “What’s my vision? Two words: nation building,” Anthony Pico, chairman of the Viejas band of Kumeyaay Indians, told tribal members and guests at a swearing-in ceremony yesterday for newly elected tribal council members. View a video of Chairman Pico speaking on his vision of nation building.
 

Two weeks ago, the Viejas tribal council unanimously approved the nation-building concept. In late February, council leaders will meet with representatives from the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government to begin dialogue and create a two-day workshop on defining nation-building, Pico revealed.

VIEJAS, PADRE WATER AND NATIVE HERITAGE COMMISSION AGREE TO FURTHER CULTURAL ASSESSMENT AT SACRED SITE

 

November 17, 2010 (Alpine) – The Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians and Padre Dam Municipal Water District today announced an agreement to conduct further tribal cultural resource investigations at a proposed development site which has been declared a sanctified Native American burial ground and ceremonial site.

PASSAGES: ANNA PRIETO SANDOVAL, SYCUAN’S FIRST WOMAN TRIBAL CHAIR

 

Sandoval helped lead tribe from poverty to prosperity

 

“Our people need to understand the importance of honoring our ancestors and our traditions and to never forget the hardship and depravation our people went through to get where we are today.” –Anna Prieto Sandoval
 

By Miriam Raftery
 

November 7, 2010 (El Cajon)—Anna Prieto Sandoval, 76, former chairman of the Sycuan band of the Kumeyaay Nation, died October 28 at her home on the Sycuan reservation from complications of diabetes. She served as Sycuan’s elected chairman from 1972 to 1990 and was a leading voice in bringing Indian gaming to the reservation, helping to create one of the most successful Indian gaming establishments in the nation. Also a historian who advocated for preservation of native traditions, she was inducted into the San Diego Women’s Hall of Fame in March 2010.
 

FROM THE MOUNTAINS TO THE SEA, KUMEYAAY KIDS REDISCOVER THEIR HERITAGE

 

 

By Marisa Kezirian

 

Photos by Miriam Raftery
 

August 16, 2009 (La Jolla) – It was a day filled with education and excitement for Native American youngsters enrolled in Camp Heyaay Coome Kooknumch, which means “The Elders Long Ago Tell Our Stories.”

 

CAMPO BAND OF KUMEYAAY INDIANS RECEIVE STIMULUS FUNDS FOR CLEAN DRINKING WATER

 

July 15, 2009 (San Diego)--Congressman Bob Filner announced that the Campo Band of Kumeyaay Indians, along with six other Indian Tribes in California, will have improved access to vital water services through funds awarded from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, otherwise known as the stimulus bill.

 

WOW- IT'S A POW-WOW! SAT. FEB. 28 AT GROSSMONT COLLEGE

February 23, 2009 (El Cajon)--The 21st annual Grossmont College Pow-Wow, a celebration of American Indian culture, will be held on Saturday, Feb. 28, at the college's Student Center. Admission is free. The day-long event, which begins at noon with gourd dancing and giveaways, features American Indian dancers and drummers. Vendors will sell American Indian cuisine, clothing, art and jewelry. The Grand Entry, a procession of about 100 dancers, begins at 6 p.m.

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