U.S. Department of Justice

FEDS ANNOUNCE MASSIVE TAKEDOWN OF EAST COUNTY DRUG TRAFFICKING NETWORKS TIED TO SINALOA CARTEL

85 defendants charged for distributing methamphetamine, heroin and fentanyl

East County News Service

September 19, 2019 (San Diego’s East County) -- Eight indictments were unsealed today in San Diego federal court, charging 85 members of drug distribution networks linked to the Sinaloa Cartel with federal drug trafficking, money laundering and firearms offenses. Authorities are searching for 38 defendants; the rest are in state or federal custody, the U.S. Department of Justice in San Diego announced.

STATE SENATE APPROVES BLOCK BILL TO PROTECT RIGHTS OF DISABLED VOTERS

 

May 23, 2015 (Sacramento)-- A bill, SB 589, to ensure that people with disabilities are not denied their right to vote in California was approved by the state Senate today on a 27-10 bipartisan vote. The measure was approved as the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday that it is investigating allegations that the state is denying voting rights to these citizens.

FBI ACCEPTING JOB APPLICATIONS

 

Deadline Extended to March 31, 2015

March 18, 2015 (San Diego's East County) - “Joining the FBI is like no other career choice you have explored. It is challenging. It is exciting. It is rewarding and every day you have a chance to serve your country,” says Special Agent Darrell Foxworth.

JUSTICE DEPT. TO TRIBES: MARIJUANA GROWING ON RESERVATIONS ACCEPTABLE, WITH LIMITS

 

East County News Service

January 11, 2015 (Washington D.C.) – At the request of Native American tribes, the U.S. Department of Justice has issued a policy statement offering guidance to U.S. Attorneys on priorities for enforcing marijuana laws on tribal lands. Given that many states have legalized marijuana for medical, agricultural or recreational use, the statement lists eight priorities for enforcement on Indian lands—and makes clear that any enforcement must require consultation with tribal partners.

JUSTICE DEPT.'S ACTION WILL DERAIL CIVIL RIGHTS, COALITION LEADERS SAY

 

Coalition of civil rights leaders say U.S. Department of Justice's use of a six-year time bar “scheme” would restrict federal Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) complainants access to the courts.

November 1, 2014 (Washington D.C.)-- The U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ), recently raised the statute 28 U.S.C. § 2401 (a) with the courts.  The general catchall statute sets a six-year limitation period on non-tort civil claims against the United States.  The DoJ, which has been representing the U.S. Department of Commerce for years in a race based complaint that two African American females filed against the Commerce Department nearly twenty (20) years ago, presented the statute in the case of Janet Howard and Joyce E. Megginson v. Rebecca Blank, Secretary-U.S. Department of Commerce, Civil Action No. 05-1968.  Most recently, the DoJ defended the statute in the Janet Howard and Joyce E. Megginson v. Penny Pritzker, Secretary-U.S. Department of Commerce proceedings (Cas. Nos. 12-5370 and 12-5392).

ASSET FORFEITURE PROGRAM BENEFITS SAN DIEGO SHERIFF AND DISTRICT ATTORNEY

 

 

By Nadin Abbott

Miriam Raftery also contributed to this report

October 12, 2014 (San Diego) In a previous story, East County Magazine covered asset forfeiture program.

http://www.eastcountymagazine.org/civil-asset-forfeiture-system-leads-abuse

This program, which started with the federal war on drugs, has evolved to the point that the law agencies share the assets that they seize, with 80% of the value staying with the local agency.

U.S. JUSTICE DEPARTMENT ASKED TO INVESTIGATE ALLEGED ABUSES IN SAN DIEGO JUVENILE DETENTION FACILITIES

 

By Miriam Raftery 

July 30, 2014 (San Diego's East County) - A complaint filed with the U.S. Department of Justice is alleging that authorities in San Diego’s juvenile detention facilities are endangering young people in custody through practices that pose substantial risks of serious harm, CityBeat reports.

FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE ANNOUNCES PUBLIC HEARINGS, COMMENT PERIOD ON PROPOSAL TO ISSUE 30-YEAR TAKE PERMITS FOR EAGLES

 

By Miriam Raftery

July 2, 2014 (San Diego’s East County)--Eagles, America’s national symbols, have special status under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act. Killing an eagle, or engaging in activities that lead to the death of an eagle, is currently punishable by  a $5,000 fine and one year in prison.  Felony convictions can result in far stiffer penalties – up to a $250,000 fine or two years in prison – and the fine for an organization that kills an eagle can be up to a half a million dollars.