Colorado River

GOLD MINE SPILLS TOXINS, THREATENING WATERWAYS ACROSS SOUTHWEST

By Miriam Raftery

Updated August 11, 2015 with a statement from the Metropolitan Water Authority.

August 10, 2015 (San Diego’s East County) – More than 3 million gallons of toxic waters contaminated with heavy metals from the King Gold Mine in Colorado were accidentally released by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency employees working at the site.   The spill has turned clean waterways in three slates a sickly mustard color from a flow moving at four to five miles per hour.

The toxic plume has flowed into major rivers in Colorado, Utah and New Mexico and is expected to soon reach Arizona, where it could potentially taint Lake Powell, the second largest reservoir in the United States and a major source of drinking water for San Diego, California as well as Las Vegas, Nevada. However the Metropolitan Water District has issued a statement indicating it does not anticipate an impact on local districts' water supplies in our region.

WATER CUTS POSSIBLE

 

East County News Service

February 10, 2015 (San Diego’s East County) – The Metropolitan Water District, which supplies San Diego County with water, warned Monday that it may cut water deliveries by 5 to 10 percent or even more this summer.  The decision will be made in April, after assessing how much water the District gets from the State Water Project, the Colorado River and other supply sources.

SOMETHING FISHY IN COACHELLA VALLEY

 

San Diego's thirst for Colorado River water threatens ecosystem at Salton Sea

By Leon Thompson

Photos:  Salton Sea Authority, U.S. Geological Survey, Salton Sea Museum, and Tobias Deml

September 20, 2014 (Salton Sea) – The rotten smell in the desert just east of East County is the harbinger of worse things yet to come.

The tell-tale odor of “rotten eggs" prompted officials to issue an air quality warning for the Coachella Valley.  The South Coast Air Quality Management District issued an odor advisory Tuesday warning residents they could experience headaches and nausea.

COLORADO RIVER FLOW CUT SHARPLY ACROSS SOUTHWEST DUE TO DROUGHT

 

By Miriam Raftery

January 25, 2014 (San Diego’s East County) – For the first time ever, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation has ordered that supplies of water from the Colorado River and Glen Canyon Dam be slashed.

The Colorado River is the most important water source for the Southwest-- and it accounts for about 60 percent of San Diego County’s water supply.  It’s under increasing pressure from a growing population in southwestern cities  amid extended  dry conditions.

SHRINKING COLORADO RIVER RESERVOIRS HIGHLIGHT NEED FOR WATER USE EFFICIENCY, SUPPLY DIVERSIFICATION

 

August 29, 2013 (San Diego) – An unprecedented reduction in reservoir releases on the Colorado River announced on Friday, August 16 by the Bureau of Reclamation won’t cut water supplies to agencies in San Diego County or the rest of the Southwest during the 2014 “water year,” but the move does underscore the importance of continued conservation and water-supply diversification across the region.

OUTCRY ARISES OVER NATIVE PEOPLES LOSING LANDS AND WAY OF LIFE

 

 

Pollution of earth and water is driving indigenous peoples from their homelands

By Miriam Raftery

April 27, 2013 (San Diego)--Around the world, including here in the U.S.,  native people are losing lands they have occupied for countless generations.  The earth and water that sustained life in their communities is being destroyed –once-mighty rivers and wetlands reduced to barren, parched or even contaminated land.  The story is the same from tribes along the Colorado River to those deep in the Amazon, from the deserts of Southern California to the jungles of Mexico, from the coal fields of Appalachia to the copper mining pits of Arizona to indigenous people’s lands in Canada threatened by the Keystone Pipeline.

The culprit?  Growing demand for energy and water. 

Now, native people are speaking out.  They hope to educate the public to conserve precious resources, sharing knowledge of the heart-breaking price being paid by people who have been given no choice—and whose very cultural identity centers around the lands and waters being lost.

TICKETS NOW ON SALE FOR WATERSHED, AWARD-WINNING REDFORD FILM PREMIERE JULY 28 AT WATER CONSERVATION GARDEN

July 13, 2012 (San Diego’s East County) –  A premiere screening of  Watershed, will debut at the Water Conservation Garden at Cuyamaca College on July 28 at 8:15 p.m.  Tickets go on sale today. 

The film tells the story of threats to the once-mighty Colorado River—and offers solutions for the future of the American west.   It is produced by the Redford Center, established by actor Robert Redford.

CRUCIAL WATER FORUM MAY 1 IN EL CAJON

The “Water Talks” Meeting at the Ronald Reagan Community Center is being held to address challenges facing the Colorado River

April 30, 2012 (El Cajon) – The “Water Talks” Meeting will be held at the Ronald Reagan Community Center, 195 E. Douglas Ave., El Cajon on May 1 from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.  The San Diego County Water Authority and San Diego County residents will discuss the Water Authority’s efforts to ensure a reliable supply of water from the Colorado River, which is the single largest supplier of water to residents of the county.